Photos: Sean Rayford/Getty Images; Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The Cook Political Report on Thursday changed its forecast of Arizona in the presidential race from "toss up" to "lean Democrat," citing new polling data that shows the Sun Belt state slipping away from President Trump.

Why it matters: The rating in a crucial swing state doesn't bode well for President Trump's re-election chances. He won the state by more than 3 points in 2016.

The state of play: Trump's performance in the state is largely driven by changing attitudes in Maricopa County, surrounding Phoenix, where about two-thirds of the state's voters come from, according to Cook.

  • "Voters there, as in other suburban areas in and around big metro areas, have soured on Pres. Trump," Cook writes.
  • Cook cited FiveThirtyEight's average of recent polls, which has Biden's lead in the state at 4.3 points.
  • Trump is struggling with the all-important Latino vote in the state, garnering just 17% support compared with Joe Biden's 55%, according to a Cook survey out this week.

Worth noting: Two of the Trump's most vocal Republican critics, former Sens. John McCain and Jeff Flake, served in the Senate from Arizona.

  • Only 73% of Arizona Republicans say they will definitely vote for Trump, with 9% saying they are probably or definitely voting for Joe Biden, according to the Cook survey.

Go deeper: Cook says Biden has Electoral College edge

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Trump casts ballot in Florida ahead of massive campaign weekend

President Trump. Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

President Trump cast his ballot in Florida on Saturday ahead of a jam-packed weekend of campaigning just 10 days ahead of the general election.

The big picture: Trump registered as a Florida voter in 2018, citing his Mar-a-Lago residence. His in-person vote comes amid a massive uptick in mail-in voting due to the coronavirus pandemic, but Trump argues mail-in voting is typically unsafe and ripe for fraud.

Voto Latino: Latino voters in red states are mobilizing for racial equity

Axios' Margaret Talev (left) and María Teresa Kumar, CEO and president of Voto Latino. Photo: Axios

María Teresa Kumar, CEO and president of Voto Latino, said Friday that Black and Latino voters for the first time see racial justice as a top issue, not just at the national level but in their state and local governments.

By the numbers: Fifteen million Latinos are eligible to vote in this election but are not registered. Four million Latino Americans have become eligible to vote since 2016, and every 30 seconds a Latino becomes of age to vote.

Post-debate poll finds Biden strong on every major issue

Joe Biden speaks Friday about "The Biden Plan to Beat COVID-19," at The Queen theater in Wilmington, Del. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

This is one of the bigger signs of trouble for President Trump that we've seen in a poll: Of the final debate's seven topics, Joe Biden won or tied on all seven when viewers in a massive Axios-SurveyMonkey sample were asked who they trusted more to handle the issue.

Why it matters: In a time of unprecedented colliding crises for the nation, the polling considered Biden to be vastly more competent.