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Sen. Mitt Romney (R-Utah) speaking to reporters on Capitol Hill on April 14. Photo: Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times via Getty Image

Members of Congress are spending tens of thousands of dollars on personal security for them and their families in the wake of the Jan. 6 riot, according to an analysis of first-quarter Federal Election Commission reports by Punchbowl News.

Between the lines: Private security expenditures were especially common among anti-Trump Republicans and high-profile Democrats who earlier this year voted to impeach and convict the former president for inciting the deadly Jan. 6 Capitol riot, signaling they fear for the safety of themselves and their families.

By the numbers:

  • Sen. Pat Toomey (R-Pa.): Nearly $70,000
  • Sen. Mitt Romney (R-Utah): $43,633
  • Rep. Liz Cheney (R-Wyo.): $50,400
  • Rep. John Katko (R-N.Y.): $19,874
  • Rep. Eric Swalwell (D-Calif.): $44,400
  • Rep. Anthony Gonzalez (R-Ohio): $1,540
  • Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.): More than $45,000

The big picture: Lawmakers in the past have spent money for additional security, but security expenditures dramatically increased throughout the Trump administration, according to Punchbowl.

  • House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) announced in February new security measures for congressional members traveling to and from Washington, including stationing additional police at airports in the D.C. area.
  • Pelosi is also preparing a $2 billion supplemental spending bill that would grow the ranks of the Capitol Police force and provide some lawmakers additional security in their districts, according to Punchbowl.

Go deeper

Trump endorses Wyoming GOP chair citing Liz Cheney censure

Former President Donald Trump. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Former President Trump endorsed Wyoming GOP chairman Frank Eathorne's bid for reelection in a statement Thursday, pointing to Eathorne's role in censuring Rep. Liz Cheney (R-Wyo.).

Why it matters: Cheney, the 3rd ranking Republican in the House, has been a fierce critic of Trump and was one of the few Republicans who voted to impeach Trump for "incitement of insurrection" following the events of Jan. 6. Trump has said he wants to "get rid" of Republicans who backed impeachment.

Pelosi says she doesn't support bill on Supreme Court expansion

Nancy Pelosi. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Hours after Democrats introduced a bill that would expand the Supreme Court from 9 to 13 justices, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) said that she does not support the bill and will not bring it to the floor.

Driving the news: Speaking at her weekly press briefing on Thursday, Pelosi didn't rule out the possibility of expanding the Supreme Court, but she said she supports President Biden's commission to study the issue.

Operational failure left Capitol vulnerable during Jan. 6 attack, IG will testify

Trump supporters storming the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021. Photo: Brent Stirton/Getty Images

Operational and intelligence failures left the U.S. Capitol Police unable to effectively respond to the deadly Jan 6 attack on the Capitol, Inspector General Michael Bolton will say during a House hearing Thursday, according to his prepared testimony obtained by AP.

Why it matters: The subject of hearing in the House Administration Committee will be a damning, 104-page watchdog report on the department's response to the riot, which was completed in March but has not been released to the public. Chair Zoe Lofgren (D-Calif.) called it "detailed and disturbing."