Mitch McConnell, Steven Mnuchin and Chuck Schumer. Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

A procedural vote on Senate Republicans' $1.8 trillion Phase 3 stimulus package failed on Monday for the second time in less than 24 hours.

The big picture: Patience is wearing thin on Capitol Hill as talks over providing desperately needed aid to Americans and businesses continue to stall.

  • Republican senators, many of whom have been more frustrated in the last 24 hours than I've ever seen them, are accusing Democrats of playing politics during a national crisis.
  • Meanwhile, Democrats continue to argue that the Senate GOP's legislation is a corporate slush fund that doesn't do enough to help American workers. This has driven House Speaker Nancy Pelosi to draft her own version of a Phase 3 bill.
  • Today's motion to proceed with the bill failed entirely along party lines, with the exception of Sen. Doug Jones (D-Ala.), who voted with Republicans in favor of the motion to proceed with a vote on the package.

What they're saying:

  • Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell: “I’d like to see Senate Democrats tell small business employees in their states who are literally being laid off every day that they’re filibustering relief that will keep people on the payroll because Democrats’ special interest friends want to squeeze employers while they’re vulnerable."
  • Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer: "The bottom line is very simple. We are fighting for a better bill because this bill will have an effect for a very long time."
  • Pelosi: “The Senate Republicans’ bill, as presented, put corporations first, not workers and families. Today, House Democrats will unveil a bill that takes responsibility for the health, wages and well-being of America’s workers: the Take Responsibility for Workers and Families Act." (Details)

What's next: Democrats are prepared to continue blocking the Senate Republicans' bill until they get more concessions. Negotiations will continue until both parties, as well as the White House, can strike a deal that delivers the necessary 60 votes to move to a final vote.

Go deeper

Former Louisville officer indicted on wanton endangerment in Breonna Taylor case

A grand jury has indicted Brett Hankison, one of the Louisville police officers who entered Breonna Taylor's home in March, on three counts of wanton endangerment for firing shots blindly into neighboring apartments.

The state of play: None of the three officers involved in the botched drug raid will face charges related to the actual death of Taylor, such as homicide or manslaughter. The two other officers who fired shots, Jonathan Mattingly and Myles Cosgrove, were not charged at all. Hankison's bond was set at $15,000.

FDA chief vows agency will not accept political pressure on coronavirus vaccine

Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Stephen Hahn promised that "science will guide our decision" for a coronavirus vaccine at a Senate hearing on Wednesday.

Why it matters: More Americans are expressing doubt about a first-generation vaccine, despite President Trump's efforts to push an unrealistic timeline that conflicts with medical experts in his administration.

CEO confidence rises for the first time in over 2 years

Data: Business Roundtable; Chart: Naema Ahmed/Axios

A closely-watched CEO economic confidence index rose for the first time after declining for nine straight quarters, according to a survey of 150 chief executives of the biggest U.S. companies by trade group Business Roundtable.

Why it matters: The index, which still remains at a decade low, reflects corporate America's expectations for sales, hiring and spending — which plummeted amid uncertainty when the pandemic hit.

Get Axios AM in your inbox

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!