Bernie Sanders arrives to speak during a "Care Not Cuts" rally in support of the Affordable Care Act. Photo: John Minchillo / AP

The most popular hashtag used by members of Congress in 2017 was #trumpcare, with nearly 12,000 posts using the tag, according to a report by Quorum, a public affairs software platform. Health care hashtags held four of the top five spots and #taxreform was #3.

The most retweeted tweets: Sen. Bernie Sanders takes the winning slot with his tweet: "President Trump, you made a big mistake. By trying to divide us up by race, religion, gender and nationality you actually broughy us closer." It was retweeted 452,940 times, per Quorum.

Graphic detailing most retweeted tweets from Congress. Courtesy Quorum.

See the full report, "How Congress Used Social Media in 2017."

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Gulf Coast braces for Zeta after storm strengthens into hurricane

Hurricane Zeta's forecast path. Photo: National Hurricane Center

Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards (D) declared a state of emergency Monday as Zeta strengthened into a hurricane and threatened Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula as it moved towards the U.S. Gulf Coast.

The state of play: Zeta was expected to make landfall on the northern part of the Yucatan Peninsula Monday night, bringing with it a "dangerous storm surge" and "heavy rainfall" as it moved into the Gulf of Mexico, the National Hurricane Service said.

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Supreme Court rejects request to extend Wisconsin absentee ballot deadline

Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

The Supreme Court in a 5-3 decision Monday rejected an effort by Wisconsin Democrats and civil rights groups to extend the state's deadline for counting absentee ballots to six days after Election Day, as long as they were postmarked by Nov. 3.

Why it matters: All ballots must now be received by 8 p.m. on Election Day in Wisconsin, a critical swing state in the presidential election.