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The Stonewall Jackson statue is propped in front of student barracks at Virginia Military Institute. Photo by Education Images/Universal Images Group via Getty

Virginia Military Institute's Board of Visitors voted on Thursday to remove a statue of Confederate Gen. Stonewall Jackson from outside student barracks, amid allegations of an enduring racist culture at the school, per the Washington Post.

Why it matters: The decision comes as the U.S. continues to grapple with its history of systemic racism and oppression of Black Americans.

Catch-up quick: Earlier this year, Black VMI alumni launched a petition that called for the removal of the Jackson statue, saying it would be a "starting point" in acknowledging "the racism and black prejudice that still occurs" at the state-supported military school.

  • Until a few years ago, cadets passing the statue had to salute Jackson, an enslaver who taught at VMI before the Civil War, per the Post.
  • Despite the calls, then-VMI superintendent Gen. J.H. Binford Peay III defended Jackson as a “a staunch Christian” and “a military genius."
  • But Peay resigned this week following Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam's decision to order an independent investigation into "the clear and appalling culture of ongoing structural racism" at the school.

Where it stands: It is unclear where the statue will go.

  • John Boland, the Board of Visitor's chairman, suggested the statute could be moved to New Market, the Civil War battlefield where VMI cadets died while fighting for the Confederacy, the Post reported.
  • Boland said the school's administration should ultimately recommend its final resting place.

Worth noting: VMI was the last public college in Virginia to integrate, only admitting five Black students in 1968, according to the Post.

Go deeper: Dozens of Confederate symbols removed in wake of George Floyd's death

Go deeper

Scoop: MMA icon eyes run for New Mexico House seat

Mixed martial arts trainer Greg Jackson, right, consoles Diego Sanchez after he lost a fight in 2012. Photo: Josh Hedges/Zuffa LLC/Zuffa LLC via Getty Images

A renowned mixed martial arts coach is considering an independent run for the U.S. House seat in New Mexico being vacated by Deb Haaland, potentially disrupting the Democrats' effort to retain it in a closely divided Congress, Axios has learned.

Why it matters: The potential candidate, Greg Jackson, is a celebrity within the MMA world. A campaign by him could attract enough votes to throw off the carefully calibrated picks the Democrats and Republicans are expected to make in the special election to succeed Haaland, who is being nominated to serve as Interior secretary.

Dave Lawler, author of World
1 hour ago - World

Americans increasingly see China as an enemy

One in three Americans, and a majority of Republicans, now view China as an enemy of the United States, according to a new survey from Pew Research Center.

By the numbers: Just 9% of Americans consider China a "partner," while 55% see Beijing as a "competitor" and 34% as an "enemy."

Scoop: Leaked HHS docs spotlight Biden's child migrant dilemma

A group of undocumented immigrants walk toward a Customs and Border Patrol station after being apprehended. Photo: Sergio Flores/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Fresh internal documents from the Department of Health and Human Services show how quickly the number of child migrants crossing the border is overwhelming the administration's stretched resources.

Driving the news: In the week ending March 1, the Border Patrol referred to HHS custody an average of 321 children per day, according to documents obtained by Axios. That's up from a weekly average of 203 in late January and early February — and just 47 per day during the first week of January.