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U.S. soccer star Megan Rapinoe at the 2019 Women's World Cup. She's pledged to posthumously donate her brain to concussion research. Photo: Franck Fife/AFP via Getty Images

Girls who play soccer are at risk from concussion at nearly the same rate as boys who play football, a new study finds.

By the numbers: Boys who played football had the most concussions — 10 per every 10,000 practices or games — according to the study of 20 sports, published in the journal Pediatrics. Girls who played soccer were next, with concussions occurring in eight per 10,000 instances.

  • The CDC notes that girls have "higher rates of concussion than boys in high school soccer" and that concussions most "commonly occur when an athlete is heading the ball." Per the CDC:
    • About 1 in 3 concussions among girls happens during heading (31%).
    • About 1 in 4 concussions among boys happens during heading (28%).

The big picture: CBS News notes that U.S. women's national soccer team star Megan Rapinoe and retired USWNT players Abby Wambach, Michelle Akers and Brandi Chastain have pledged to posthumously donate their brains for concussion research.

What they're saying: The CDC "HEADS UP Concussion in Youth Sports" initiative that provides information to coaches, parents and athletes recommends that children aged 10 and younger should not head balls and that 11- to 13-year-olds should limit heading to practices only.

  • It recommends that athletes are taught to avoid collisions to reduce the chances of concussion occurring and that unsafe actions should be avoided, such as making illegal contact.
  • Tripping hazards should be removed and equipment including goalposts should have padding that's in good condition, per the CDC.

Go deeper: The NFL is changing how it handles concussions

Go deeper

9 mins ago - Podcasts

Former FDA chief Rob Califf on the vaccine approval process

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is reviewing two emergency use authorization requests for COVID-19 vaccines, with an outside advisory committee scheduled to meet next Thursday to review data from Pfizer and its German partner BioNTech.

Axios Re:Cap digs in with former FDA commissioner Rob Calif about the EUA process, the science and who should make the final call.

14 mins ago - Politics & Policy

The recovery needs rocket fuel

Data: BLS. Chart: Axios Visuals

Friday's deeply disappointing jobs report should light a fire under Congress, which has dithered despite signs the economy is struggling to kick back into gear.

Driving the news: President-elect Biden said Friday afternoon in Wilmington that he supports another round of $1,200 checks.

1 hour ago - Health

CDC: It's time for "universal face mask use"

Photo: Paul Hennessy/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty

The CDC is urging “universal face mask use” for the first time since the coronavirus pandemic began, citing recent case spikes as the U.S. has entered a phase of “high-level transmission” before winter officially begins.

Why it matters: Daily COVID-related deaths across the U.S. hit a new record on Wednesday. Face coverings have been shown to increase protection of the wearer and those around them, despite some Americans' reluctance to use them.