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Expand chart
Data: College Reaction poll of 3,633 college students conducted Sept. 20-25, 2018; Chart: Chris Canipe/Axios

Nearly half of college students say they'll "definitely" vote this year, according to a survey by College Reaction, a group that measures public opinion among college students.

Why it matters: If true, that kind of turnout could help Democrats, since Republican students are more lukewarm about whether they'll vote. But in reality, young voters aren't exactly known for rushing to the polls in midterm elections. It would take a sharp break with recent history for that to become a reality.

By the numbers:

  • Only 18% of college students voted in the 2014 midterm elections, according to the group.
  • By contrast, about 48% of college students voted in 2016 and 45% did so in 2012, according to a study by Tufts University.
  • If the enthusiasm in the new survey is real, it's a change from earlier surveys this year. One, released in July by the Public Religion Research Institute, found that just 28% of young adults said they were sure to vote in 2018, compared to 74% of seniors.

Go deeper:

Turnout surges among young voters in battleground states' primaries

Wave watch: Inside the Democratic primary turnout surge

Go deeper

Dan Primack, author of Pro Rata
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Be smart: There will be a coronavirus vaccine for adults long before there is one for kids.

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Sen. Kelly Loeffler to return to campaign trail after 2nd negative test

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Sen. Kelly Loeffler's (R-Ga.) campaign announced Monday that she "looks forward to getting back out on the campaign trail" after testing negative for COVID-19 for a second time, following earlier conflicting results.

Why it matters: Loeffler has been campaigning at events ahead of a Jan. 5 runoff in elections that'll decide which party holds the Senate majority. Vice President Mike Pence was with her on Friday.

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Key government agency says Biden transition can formally begin

General Services Administrator Emily Murphy. Photo: Alex Edelman/CNP/Getty Images

General Services Administrator Emily Murphy said in a letter to President-elect Joe Biden on Monday that she has determined the transition from the Trump administration can formally begin.

Why it matters: Murphy, a Trump appointee, had come under fire for delaying the so-called "ascertainment" and withholding the funds and information needed for the transition to begin while Trump's legal challenges played out.