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Illustration: Lazaro Gamio/Axios

In June, the NCAA Playing Rules Oversight Panel voted to move the men's 3-point line from 20 feet, 9 inches to the international distance of 22 feet, 1.75 inches starting this season.

Why it matters: According to the committee, moving the line back will open up the lane for drives/cuts to the basket and additional low-post play, while keeping the 3-point revolution in check by making threes more challenging.

  • For reference, the NBA's 3-point line is 23 feet, 9 inches.

What they're saying: Two coaches. Two takes.

  • Jim Boeheim, Syracuse: "The guys who can shoot out there, the difference in the distance doesn't matter. It's not important, not relevant. I don't think it will change the number of [threes] at all."
  • Greg McDermott, Creighton: "You have to be one step closer to that 3-point shooter ... and that's a step farther away from the big guy ... I feel like the NBA's really moved away from the back-to-the-basket big. I'd hate to see that happen in college basketball, and I feel like moving the 3-point line helps that."

As for the women: At the Final Four, coaches voted against joining the men and moving the line back. UConn's Geno Auriemma wasn't thrilled.

  • Auriemma: "That was stupid, that [we] didn't move the line back. Now you've got two lines on the court. ... The further you move the line back, the better the game becomes. Because only those guys that are really good 3-point shooters will be shooting it."
  • By the numbers: The women's 3-point line is 20 feet, 9 inches from the hoop at the top of the key — 16.75 inches closer than the new line for the men.

Go deeper: A look at this season's college basketball storylines

Go deeper

3 hours ago - Health

Fauci: COVID vaccine rollout needs to prioritize people of color

Anthony Fauci. Photo: Alex Wong via Getty Images

Infectious disease expert Anthony Fauci highlighted the need to address racial disparities in the COVID-19 vaccination process, per an interview with The New England Journal of Medicine on Wednesday.

What he’s saying: "I think that's the one thing we really got to be careful of. We don't want in the beginning ... most of the people who are getting it are otherwise, well, middle-class white people."

The Mischief Makers

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Several Republican and Democratic lawmakers are emerging as troublemakers within their parties and political thorns for their leadership.

Why it matters: We're calling this group "The Mischief Makers" — members who threaten to upend party unity — the theme eclipsing Washington at the moment — and potentially jeopardize the Democrats' or Republicans' position heading into the 2022 midterms.

5 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Obama speechwriter fears Biden unity drive is one-sided

Cody Keenan (right) is shown heading to Marine One in December 2009. Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

President Obama's former speechwriter says he's "preemptively frustrated" with President Biden's effort to find unity with Republicans.

What they're saying: Cody Keenan told Axios that Biden's messaging team has "struck all the right chords," but at some point "they're gonna have to answer questions like, 'Why didn't you achieve unity?' when there's an entire political party that's already acting to stop it."