CNN's Dash Bash moderates a town hall with Texas Senate Democratic candidate Beto O'Rourke. Photo: Edward M. Pio-Roda/CNN

Since Tuesday is political journalism's Game Day, we talked with three of the cable stars of election night about how they prep. Our first conversation was with CNN chief political correspondent Dana Bash, who'll track the Senate drama:

Bash's travels this cycle included her 49th state, North Dakota, where she sat on a big tractor (elusive #50: Montana): "When you see it and you touch it and you smell it, it gives invaluable understanding of what's going on out there."

  • "Most recently, I was in Missouri. And what really struck me was the potency of this immigration message that the president and the Republicans like Josh Hawley are pushing. I was spending the day with [Sen.] Claire McCaskill and she did press conferences after every event. The very first press conference [in Springfield], she was taking questions and nobody asked her about the caravan. And she so wanted to talk about it. She said: 'Nobody's going to ask me about this? I just want to say that ... there's no daylight between myself and the President on border security.' Unsolicited — wanted to get that message out there. And that was a lightbulb."

Her forecast: "I am so out of the prediction business. I'm just along for the ride. ... [M]y sense is probably we'll have a good idea of where the Senate is going to go earlier than the House, because a lot of the House races are West Coast and could take a little longer."

  • Her Game Day tradition: "I don't even know how it started, but I bring in fresh-cut mango for Eric Sherling [CNN's senior vice president of Washington and Special Events Programming]. I think I did it once and we had a really good debate or town hall. And so, kind of like a good, superstitious baseball player or fighter pilot, I figured, I don't want to rock this boat. So I'm just going to keep bringing mango in."

Tomorrow: Fox News' Bret Baier. Tuesday: MSNBC's Steve Kornacki.

Subscribe to Axios AM/PM for a daily rundown of what's new and why it matters, directly from Mike Allen.
Please enter a valid email.
Please enter a valid email.
Server error. Please try a different email.
Subscribed! Look for Axios AM and PM in your inbox tomorrow or read the latest Axios AM now.

Go deeper

Senate to vote on Amy Coney Barrett's confirmation on Oct. 26

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell in the Capitol on Oct. 20. Photo: Stefani Reynolds/Getty Images

The Senate will vote to confirm Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court next Monday, Oct. 26, Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) announced Tuesday.

The big picture: The Senate Judiciary Committee will vote this Thursday to advance Barrett's nomination to the full Senate floor. Democrats have acknowledged that there's nothing procedurally they can do to stop Barrett's confirmation, which will take place just one week out from Election Day.

Updated 3 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Politics: Americans feel Trump's sickness makes him harder to trustFlorida breaks record for in-person early voting.
  2. Health: The next wave is gaining steam.
  3. Education: Schools haven't become hotspots.
  4. World: Ireland moving back into lockdown — Argentina becomes 5th country to report 1 million infections.

Meadows confirms Trump's tweets "declassifying" Russia documents were false

Photo: Tom Williams-Pool/Getty Images

White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows confirmed in court on Tuesday that President Trump's tweets authorizing the disclosure of documents related to the Russia investigation and Hillary Clinton's emails "were not self-executing declassification orders," after a federal judge demanded that Trump be asked about his intentions.

Why it matters: BuzzFeed News reporter Jason Leopold cited the tweets in an emergency motion seeking to gain access to special counsel Robert Mueller's unredacted report as part of a Freedom of Information Act request. This is the first time Trump himself has indicated, according to Meadows, that his tweets are not official directives.