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Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg (C) fronts a Fridays For Future protest at the Swedish Parliament in Stockholm in September. Photo: Jonathan Nacksrtrand/AFP via Getty Images

64% of people from around the world say climate change is a global emergency, a UN poll published Wednesday finds.

Why it matters: It's the biggest global survey on climate change ever conducted, with some 1.2 million participants from 50 countries — including the U.S., where 65% of those surveyed view climate change as an emergency.

  • The poll also shows there's widespread support for renewable energy, even in countries where fossil fuels are a major source of emissions — with 65% in favor in the U.S., 76% in Australia and 51% in Russia.

Of note: The findings come two days after Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) said it "might be a good idea for President Biden to call a climate emergency."

The big picture: The "People's Climate Vote" survey of people over the age of 14, organized by the UN Development Program and Oxford University, was conducted via ads distributed in mobile gaming apps from last October to December.

  • Cassie Flynn, UNDP's strategic adviser on climate change and head of its Climate Promise initiative, came up with the idea to advertise on apps like Angry Birds.
  • Some 550,000 people aged 14 to 18 took part in the survey, which had a margin of error of +/- 2%.

The bottom line: "There is a groundswell of people that are saying even during a pandemic that climate change is an emergency and here’s how we want to solve it," Flynn told Al Jazeera.

  • "Governments are facing extraordinary decisions that will affect generations to come, whether in dealing with COVID-19 or climate. The decisions about our future are being locked in now."

Read the full report, via DocumentCloud:

Go deeper

Ben Geman, author of Generate
Jan 28, 2021 - Energy & Environment

Takeaways from Biden's sweeping order on climate change

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

President Biden's mammoth executive order on climate policy weighs in at over 7,500 words and resists any single narrative, but I've got a few initial takeaways.

Why it matters: The order aims to marshal the entire federal government behind new initiatives, so that means agencies that may not have the muscle memory or expertise of the resource and environmental branches like EPA and DOE.

John Hinckley, who shot Reagan, wins unconditional release

John Hinckley Jr. sitting on the back seat of a car in 1981. Photo: Bettmann / Getty Images

A federal judge on Monday approved the unconditional release of John Hinckley Jr., who tried to assassinate former President Reagan in 1981.

State of play: U.S. District Court Judge Paul L. Friedman in Washington ruled that Hinckley can be freed from all court supervision in 2022 if he remains mentally stable and continues to follow rules that were imposed on him after he was released from a Washington mental health facility in 2016 to live in Virginia, AP reports.

Rep. Karen Bass launches run for Los Angeles mayor

Photo: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

Rep. Karen Bass (D-Calif.) on Monday launched her bid for mayor of Los Angeles.

Why it matters: Bass is a high-profile member of Congress. The former chair of the Congressional Black Caucus, she was considered as a potential running mate to President Joe Biden and was a lead negotiator in the recently-ended talks on police reform. Should Bass win the mayoral election, she would become the first female mayor in L.A. history.