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Photo: Olivier Douliery-Pool/Getty Images

Faced with constant interruptions and shouting from President Trump, moderator Chris Wallace failed to maintain control over the 2020 campaign's first general election presidential debate.

  • At one point, the back and forth between Trump and Wallace got so bad, that Wallace asked Trump, "You know, sir, if you wanna switch seats, we could do that."

Why it matters: The hectic nature of the first debate caused an instant debate over how the remaining debates could be conducted for the 2020 campaign.

Be smart: The longtime Fox News anchor is considered one of the best in the business, and he's respected by both political parties.

  • His failure to stop Trump from talking over both him and Joe Biden had political pundits debating Tuesday night whether future debates should allow moderators the ability to cut the candidates' mics.

CNN's Wolf Blitzer said it "will certainly raise a lot of questions about the future of the presidential debate between these two candidates."

  • "I wouldn't be surprised if this is the last presidential debate between the president and the former vice president."
  • "Clearly this debate was an embarrassment for the United States of America." 

CBS' Norah O'Donnell asked, "Can we really have two more of these debates, after what we saw tonight?"

The bottom line: Critics noted that Wallace failed to call out Trump for violating debate rules for more than an hour into the debate. Wallace tried, beginning early on in the debate, to stop the president's interruptions.

  • But his efforts ultimately proved moot, as Trump mostly dominated the debate with interjections.

Go deeper

Your guide to Congress' certification of Biden's win

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

There's no doubt about the outcome — Congress will ratify Joe Biden's election win and he'll be sworn in on Jan. 20 — but that won't stop today's political theater that may drag late into the night.

  • Here's our guide to watching the certification debate, with input from legislative aides, historians, election experts and Axios' Ursula Perano.
Updated 26 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

  1. Health: Most vulnerable Americans aren't getting enough vaccine information — Fauci says Trump administration's lack of facts on COVID "very likely" cost lives.
  2. Education: Schools face an uphill battle to reopen during the pandemic.
  3. Vaccine: Florida requiring proof of residency to get vaccine — CDC extends interval between vaccine doses for exceptional cases.
  4. World: Hong Kong puts tens of thousands on lockdown as cases surge — Pfizer to supply 40 million vaccine doses to lower-income countries — Brazil begins distributing AstraZeneca vaccine.
  5. Sports: 2021 Tokyo Olympics hang in the balance.
  6. 🎧 Podcast: Carbon Health's CEO on unsticking the vaccine bottleneck.

DOJ: Capitol rioter threatened to "assassinate" Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez

Supporters of former President Trump storm the U.S. Captiol on Jan. 6. Photo: Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

A Texas man who has been charged with storming the U.S. Capitol in the deadly Jan. 6 siege posted death threats against Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.), the Department of Justice said.

The big picture: Garret Miller faces five charges in connection to the riot by supporters of former President Trump, including violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds and making threats. According to court documents, Miller posted violent threats online the day of the siege, including tweeting “Assassinate AOC.”