Sen. Chris Coons (D-Del.) told CNN's "State of the Union" Sunday that he would be open to expanding the Supreme Court if Republicans do not "step back from this precipice" of confirming Judge Amy Coney Barrett before the election.

Why it matters: Coons is one of the more moderate Democrats in the Senate and one of Biden's closest allies. Adding more justices to the court was once considered an extreme policy position on the left, but it has become a more accepted position among Democrats since the Barrett nomination.

What he's saying: Coons told CNN's Jake Tapper that "like Joe Biden," he is "not a fan of expanding the court." But he explained that he felt Barrett was an "extreme, unqualified nominee" that Republicans were rushing to confirm.

  • "If we happen to be in the fact pattern where we have a President Biden, we'll have to look at what the right steps are to rebalance our federal judiciary," Coons said.

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Senate to vote on Amy Coney Barrett's confirmation on Oct. 26

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell in the Capitol on Oct. 20. Photo: Stefani Reynolds/Getty Images

The Senate will vote to confirm Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court next Monday, Oct. 26, Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) announced Tuesday.

The big picture: The Senate Judiciary Committee will vote this Thursday to advance Barrett's nomination to the full Senate floor. Democrats have acknowledged that there's nothing procedurally they can do to stop Barrett's confirmation, which will take place just one week out from Election Day.

Only 3% of Americans have no opinion on whether Barrett should join Supreme Court

Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett. Photo: Anna Moneymaker-Pool/Getty Images

Only 3% of Americans have no opinion on whether Judge Amy Coney Barrett should be confirmed to the Supreme Court, per a Gallup poll released Tuesday.

Why it matters: It's a historic low for those who have no opinion on a pick to the high court in Gallup's initial polling — previously, 19% had no opinion on Merrick Garland, Sonia Sotomayor and John Roberts — and it highlights the extremely polarized nature of today's politics.

Updated Oct 20, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Supreme Court denies Pennsylvania GOP request to limit mail-in voting

Protesters outside Supreme Court. Photo: Daniel Slim/AFP via Getty Images

The Supreme Court on Monday denied a request from Pennsylvania's Republican Party to shorten the deadlines for mail-in ballots in the state. Thanks to the court's 4-4 deadlock, ballots can be counted for several days after Election Day.

Why it matters: It's a major win for Democrats that could decide the fate of thousands of ballots in a crucial swing state that President Trump won in 2016. The court's decision may signal how it would deal with similar election-related litigation in other states.