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Photo: Drew Angerer via Getty Images

Former New Jersey governor Chris Christie is being considered to replace Jeff Sessions as attorney general, according to CNN and CBS News.

Why it matters: Barring a recusal, the next attorney general will oversee the Russia investigation. Christie remains a Trump loyalist on most issues, but has been outspoken in his defense of special counsel Robert Mueller and his belief that Trump should let the investigation proceed uninterrupted.

What he's said:

  • On Trump's attacks on Mueller (May, 2018): "I've told [Trump] many times that there's no way to make an investigation like this shorter, but there's lots of ways to make it longer. And he's executed on a number of those ways to make it longer... Bob Mueller himself is not a partisan, he's an honest guy, he is a hard working guy, he's smart and you can't argue that the investigation hasn't been effective so far."
  • On bias in the Mueller investigation (Dec., 2017): "Bob Mueller is a good man who I think will try to do the right thing by this investigation, but that doesn't mean he's perfect. And by allowing folks [like Peter Strzok and Andrew Weissmann] into the investigation that can be charged, based upon their own words, with having a bias towards Mrs. Clinton or against President Trump, it's an issue."
  • On Don McGahn cooperating with Mueller (April, 2018): "This shows what a C-level legal team the president had at the beginning with Ty Cobb and John Dowd. You never waive [executive privilege], absolutely not, and it put Don McGahn in an impossible situation. Once you waive that privilege and you turn over all those documents, Don McGahn has no choice then but to go in and answer everything, answer every question they can ask him."
  • On Trump sitting down for an interview with Mueller (April, 2018): "He should never walk into that room with Robert Mueller. Because in the end, one of the things that makes the president who he is, is that he’s a salesman. And salesmen, at times, tend to be hyperbolic. Right, and this president certainly has tended to do that. That’s OK when you’re on the campaign hustle. That’s OK when you’re working on Congress. It is not OK when you’re sitting talking to federal agents... That can send you to jail.”
  • On Jared Kushner (Dec., 2017): "He deserves the scrutiny. You know why? Because he was involved in the transition and involved in meetings that call into question his role."
  • On Rudy Giuliani claiming the president can't obstruct justice (June, 2018): "It's an outrageous claim. It's wrong."
  • On Trump Tower meeting (Aug., 2017): "This meeting was ill-advised. This is not something that should have happened...Everybody in retrospect knew this was a bad idea. But let's not jump ahead of ourselves. We don't know if the president knew about those emails."

Axios will be publishing these previews on different topics as potential names are floated for Attorney General.

Go deeper

Trump pressures Barr to release so-called Durham report

Bill Barr. Photo: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images

President Trump and his allies are piling extreme pressure on Attorney General Bill Barr to release a report that Trump believes could hurt perceived Obama-era enemies — and view Barr's designation of John Durham as special counsel as a stall tactic, sources familiar with the conversations tell Axios.

Why it matters: Speculation over Barr's fate grew on Tuesday, with just 49 days remaining in Trump's presidency, after Barr gave an interview to the Associated Press in which he said the Justice Department has not uncovered evidence of widespread fraud that could change the election's outcome.

CDC to cut guidance on quarantine period for coronavirus exposure

A health care worker oversees cars as people arrive to get tested for coronavirus at a testing site in Arlington, Virginia, on Tuesday. Photo: Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

The CDC will soon shorten its guidance for quarantine periods following exposure to COVID-19, AP reported Tuesday and Axios can confirm.

Why it matters: Quarantine helps prevent the spread of the coronavirus, which can occur before a person knows they're sick or if they're infected without feeling any symptoms. The current recommended period to stay home if exposed to the virus is 14 days. The CDC plans to amend this to 10 days or seven with a negative test, an official told Axios.

  • The CDC did not immediately respond to a request for comment.
4 hours ago - Health

CDC panel: COVID vaccines should go to health workers, long-term care residents first

Hospital staff work in the COVID-19 intensive care unit in Houston. Photo: Go Nakamura via Getty

Health-care workers and nursing home residents should be at the front of the line to get coronavirus vaccines in the United States once they’re cleared and available for public use, an independent CDC panel recommended in a 13-1 emergency vote on Tuesday, per CNBC.

Why it matters: Recent developments in COVID-19 vaccines have accelerated the timeline for distribution as vaccines developed by Pfizer and Moderna undergo the federal approval process. States are preparing to begin distributing as soon as two weeks from now.