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Source: SnapStream; Graphic: Axios Visuals

The Brett Kavanaugh hearings were a rare case where all of the evening cable news shows covered the same thing — but those shows reinforced the wildly different views Americans had of what happened and what it meant.

Why it matters: We're living in different universes of news now, and if your news diet is heavy on Fox and MSNBC, your impression of the most polarizing Supreme Court nomination in decades will be different from much of the rest of the country — because it has been shaped to fit what you want to hear.

Here's what you would have heard from your favorite cable news channel the night before and the night after the hearing with Kavanaugh and Christine Blasey Ford, compared to what everyone else heard.

Thursday night, after the hearing:

  • Fox, Tucker Carlson: "Kavanaugh fights back"
  • MSNBC, Chris Hayes: "Christine Blasey Ford describes sexual assault allegations against Supreme Court nominee"
  • Fox, Sean Hannity: "Kavanaugh calls confirmation process 'a national disgrace'"
  • MSNBC, Rachel Maddow: "Kavanaugh: 'I will not be intimidated into withdrawing'"
  • Fox, Laura Ingraham: "The Kavanaugh/Ford hearings: A case of emotion vs. fact"
  • MSNBC, Lawrence O'Donnell: "Kavanaugh committee vote set for 9:30 am Friday"

Wednesday night, before the hearing:

  • Fox, Tucker Carlson: "Trump focuses on Kavanaugh chaos"
  • MSNBC, Chris Hayes: "New disturbing allegations"
  • Fox, Sean Hannity: "Democrats' shameless obstruction tactics"
  • MSNBC, Rachel Maddow: "I am here today not because I want to be. I am terrified." (Ford testimony)
  • Fox, Laura Ingraham: "The accusers' last act"
  • MSNBC, Lawrence O'Donnell: Michael Avenatti interview

Go deeper

Trump's legacy is shaped by his narrow interests

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

President Trump's policy legacy is as much defined by what he's ignored as by what he's involved himself in.

The big picture: Over the past four years, Trump has interested himself in only a slim slice of the government he leads. Outside of trade, immigration, a personal war against the "Deep State" and the hot foreign policy issue of the moment, Trump has left many of his Cabinet secretaries to work without interruption, let alone direction.

Updated 57 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Health: The good and bad news about antibody therapies — Fauci: Hotspots have materialized across "the entire country."
  2. World: Belgium imposes lockdown, citing "health emergency" due to influx of cases.
  3. Economy: Conference Board predicts economy won’t fully recover until late 2021.
  4. Education: Surge threatens to shut classrooms down again.
  5. Technology: The pandemic isn't slowing tech.
  6. Travel: CDC replaces COVID-19 cruise ban with less restrictive "conditional sailing order."
3 hours ago - Health

Ipsos poll: COVID trick-or-treat

Data: Axios/Ipsos poll; Note ±3.3% margin of error for the total sample size; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

About half of Americans are worried that trick-or-treating will spread coronavirus in their communities, according to this week's installment of the Axios/Ipsos Coronavirus Index.

Why it matters: This may seem like more evidence that the pandemic is curbing our nation's cherished pastimes. But a closer look reveals something more nuanced about Americans' increased acceptance for risk around activities in which they want to participate.