Updated Jun 10, 2018

The big picture: Chinese citizens are healthier than Americans

For the first time, Chinese people can expect to be healthy longer than Americans, according to the most recent data from the World Health Organization, even though Americans are still expected to live about two years longer than Chinese citizens.

Data: World Health Organization; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

Between the lines: Since 2010, the healthy life expectancy for Americans has dropped by 0.2 years, but for Chinese people it has increased by more than one whole year. Yun Sun, director of the China program at the Stimson Center, told Axios that as China's economy continues to boom, its people are pursuing healthier lifestyles. She added that obesity and drug use are not as common in China.

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We're entering a new golden age of China journalism

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

A growing number of investigative journalists and news organizations around the world are investing more resources in covering China from afar.

Why it matters: The Chinese Communist Party claims China's rise offers the world an alternative to western leadership and values. In the coming decade, journalism is vital to understanding exactly what kind of global leader China will be.

Go deeperArrowJan 7, 2020 - World

FBI spied on Chinese students and scientists, new book reveals

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios; Credit: Riverhead

In 1967, at the height of the Cold War, the FBI began collecting information on thousands of Chinese scientists and students in cities across the U.S. The Scientist and the Spy, a book publishing in February, reveals the existence of this former program for the first time.

Why it matters: Recent FBI indictments and investigations, targeting Chinese researchers in the U.S. and aimed at stemming the unauthorized flow of science and tech secrets to China, have raised fears among Chinese-Americans that another period of racially tinged suspicion is upon them.

Go deeperArrowJan 13, 2020 - World

China virus kills one and spreads to Thailand, but U.S. threat remains minimal

Security guards in front of the closed wholesale seafood market in Wuhan, where a man who recently died from the coronavirus had purchased goods. Photo: Noel Celis/AFP via Getty Images

A mysterious virus discovered in Wuhan, China, is believed to have played a role in the death of a patient, while another case has been reported by a person who traveled from Wuhan to Thailand, the World Health Organization confirmed Monday.

The latest: Chinese officials said Sunday that one out of 41 confirmed patients has died, but cautioned that they had underlying health issues. A public health official said the U.S. is not overly concerned the virus might spread here.

Go deeperArrowJan 13, 2020