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Indian Muslims protest against Azhar and Jaish-e-Mohammed. Photo: Indranil Mukherjee/AFP/Getty Images

In a major diplomatic win for India, the United Nations has listed Jaish-e-Mohammed leader Masood Azhar as a global terrorist after China finally supported the terror designation for the Pakistan-based militant leader.

Why it matters: Jaish-e-Mohammed is accused of carrying out numerous attacks in India, including the bombing of India’s parliament in 2001 and the suicide attack that killed 40 troops in Indian-administered Kashmir last February. That attack brought nuclear-armed rivals India and Pakistan close to war.

India has long wanted to see Azhar placed on the global terrorist list. China, an ally of Pakistan, blocked three previous attempts to designate Azhar as a terrorist.

  • The latest proposal was brought by the U.S., Britain and France in the Security Council’s sanctions committee in February, just days after the attack in Kashmir.
  • China in March demanded more time to study the proposal, but reversed course today and withdrew its objections.
  • India has also repeatedly demanded that Pakistan extradite Azhar, but Islamabad has refused, claiming there's no proof of his involvement in terrorist activities. Azhar reportedly has long-standing ties to the Pakistani security establishment.

Bottom line: The UN listing is largely a symbolic move, though Azhar will now be subject to an asset freeze, travel ban and arms embargo. But convincing the international community, including China, to back the move is a success for India.

Go deeper

Trump set to appear at Pennsylvania GOP hearing on voter fraud claims

President Trumpat the White House on Tuesday. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

President Trump is due to join his personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, Wednesday at a Republican-led state Senate Majority Policy Committee hearing to discuss alleged election irregularities.

Why it matters: This would be his first trip outside of the DMV since Election Day and comes shortly after GSA ascertained the results, formally signing off on a transition to President-elect Biden.

Scoop: Trump tells confidants he plans to pardon Michael Flynn

Photo: Alex Wroblewski/Getty Images

President Trump has told confidants he plans to pardon his former national security adviser Michael Flynn, who pleaded guilty in December 2017 to lying to the FBI about his Russian contacts, two sources with direct knowledge of the discussions tell Axios.

Behind the scenes: Sources with direct knowledge of the discussions said Flynn will be part of a series of pardons that Trump issues between now and when he leaves office.

Erica Pandey, author of @Work
10 hours ago - World

Remote work shakes up geopolitics

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

The global adoption of remote work may leave the rising powers in the East behind.

The big picture: Despite India's and China's economic might, these countries have far fewer remote jobs than the U.S. or Europe. That's affecting the emerging economies' resilience amid the pandemic.