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Photo: Naohiko Hatta - Pool/Getty Images

The Chinese Foreign Ministry on Thursday announced that the country will give the World Health Organization an additional $30 million, after donating $20 million in cash to WHO on March 11 to help fight the global coronavirus outbreak.

Why it matters: Some critics of the Trump administration’s recent call to suspend WHO funding argue that decision would increase China’s influence over the international organization.

  • Trump announced the 60-to-90-day hold on funding last week, accusing WHO of "severely mismanaging and covering up" the virus crisis.
  • China's financial commitment aims to "support its global fight against COVID-19, in particular strengthening developing countries' health systems," according to Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesperson Hua Chunying.

By the numbers: China gave the WHO $86 million in 2018-2019, Axios' Bethany Allen-Ebrahimian reports.

  • The United States, by far the largest single contributor, gifted $893 million in that same period.

What they're saying: Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Geng Shuang said the agency under Director General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus has been “actively fulfilling its duties and upholding an objective, scientific and impartial stance," according to the Washington Post.

What's next: The WHO will hold a member meeting next month where Australia is anticipated to call for an international investigation into the pandemic’s origins.

  • Geng said China opposes the investigation, noting it would amount to “political manipulation and interference in the international collaboration” to stop the pandemic.

Go deeper... Poll: Americans' views of China darken dramatically

Go deeper

How the U.S.-China consulate closures could impact espionage

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

It is a universally accepted international convention that diplomatic facilities can be used as cover for espionage activities. But the system only works if states pretend not to acknowledge it.

The state of play: A decision last week by the Trump administration to shutter the Chinese consulate in Houston over allegations that China used it for spying set off a predictable diplomatic firestorm.

3 hours ago - Politics & Policy

McConnell drops filibuster demand, paving way for power-sharing deal

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (R) and Minority Leader Mitch McConnell attend a joint session of Congress. Photo: Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell has abandoned his demand that Democrats state, in writing, that they would not abandon the legislative filibuster.

Between the lines: McConnell was never going to agree to a 50-50 power sharing deal without putting up a fight over keeping the 60-vote threshold. But the minority leader ultimately caved after it became clear that delaying the organizing resolution was no longer feasible.

5 hours ago - Technology

Scoop: Google won't donate to members of Congress who voted against election results

Sen. Ted Cruz led the group of Republicans who opposed certifying the results. Photo: Stefani Reynolds/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

Google will not make contributions from its political action committee this cycle to any member of Congress who voted against certifying the results of the presidential election, following the deadly Capitol riot.

Why it matters: Several major businesses paused or pulled political donations following the events of Jan. 6, when pro-Trump rioters, riled up by former President Trump, stormed the Capitol on the day it was to certify the election results.