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Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Half of U.S. adults are now fully vaccinated, less than six months after Pfizer got the first emergency authorization for a COVID-19 vaccine.

By the numbers: More than 287 million doses have been administered in the U.S.

The big picture: Just 39% of the overall population is fully vaccinated if you include people under 18.

  • The current rate of 1.8 million daily doses reflects a decline since mid-April, Bloomberg reports.

Teens should see widespread availability before school starts in the fall.

  • Moderna said today its vaccine is safe and 100% effective at protecting against COVID in people between ages 12 and 17, citing a Phase 3 trial of more than 3,700 participants.
  • Pfizer's vaccine received an FDA emergency use authorization for 12- to 15-year-olds earlier this month. It already had approval for use among those 16 and older.

About 14% of the nation's kids ages 12-15 have received their first shot, AP reports.

  • Among teens ages 16 and 17, that number goes up to 34% and about 22% have had both shots.
  • Depending on the state and even county, minors may be required to have a parent present.

What's next: Pfizer plans to apply for emergency use for kids ages 2–11 in September, NPR reports, and Moderna is in the trial phase for kids.

The bottom line: It increasingly looks like most who want a vaccine may be able to get one by year's end.

Go deeper

May 25, 2021 - Health

Moderna's COVID vaccine safe and highly effective in adolescents, study shows

Photo: RADEK MICA/AFP via Getty Images

Moderna on Tuesday announced that its coronavirus vaccine was found to be safe and 100% effective at protecting against COVID-19 in a Phase 3 trial of more than 3,700 participants between the ages of 12 and 17.

Why it matters: Moderna CEO Stéphane Bancel said the company plans to submit its data to global regulators in early June, paving the way for an emergency use authorization for adolescents.

Axios-Ipsos poll: Re-emerging without trust

Data: Axios/Ipsos Poll; Note: 3.2% margin of error; Chart: Axios Visuals

Americans are taking off their masks and re-engaging publicly at levels not seen since the start of the pandemic, with the most dramatic shifts in people over 50 and those who've been vaccinated, according to the latest installment of the Axios/Ipsos Coronavirus Index.

The big picture: It's happening despite significant distrust over strangers' honesty about their COVID-19 vaccination status and amid major confusion over Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidance on mask use and social distancing for those vaccinated.

May 25, 2021 - Health

Black and Hispanic Americans seeing higher COVID case rates as vaccinations lag

Black and Hispanic Americans are once again seeing higher coronavirus case rates than white Americans — as their vaccination rates continue to lag, per CDC data.

Why it matters: The virus will continue to infect and kill people who aren't protected from it. If fewer people of color are vaccinated, that means more are at risk of getting sick — which is exactly what's happening among some groups.