Nov 26, 2019

Cheddar to launch D.C.-based political show in 2020

Jon Steinberg, founder & CEO of Cheddar in 2016. Photo: Matthew Eisman/Getty Images

Cheddar is launching a political show called Cheddar Capital early next year, executives tell Axios.

The big picture: The show will be based out of D.C. and is the brainchild of Jon Steinberg's newest hire, Altice News’ VP and GM for political partnerships Peter Cherukuri.

Why it matters: Cherukuri is a political publishing veteran, having spent years managing political and policy partnerships at places like POLITICO, HuffPost, Roll Call, and National Journal.

The show, which will cater to a millennial audience, will be 30 minutes in length. The format will be interviews and round tables. 

  • Cheddar, which is now owned by Altice USA, is carried by most major streaming platforms, as well as most major cable providers.

Go deeper: Cheddar acquired by Altice USA for $200 million

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Political ads are tricky to define in digital era

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Political ads have become a flashpoint ahead of the 2020 election, in part because new technologies make it nearly impossible to apply a universal definition of them to all advertising channels.

Why it matters: Without a commonly accepted definition of what a political ad is, efforts to regulate them have been challenging. Experts worry that without smart regulation of political ads, free speech — a tenet of democracy — can be gamed.

Go deeperArrowNov 23, 2019

Google changes to political ad policy to limit targeting

Photo: NurPhoto / Contributor

Google announced Wednesday it is making changes to its political ads policy to restrict audience targeting for verified political advertisers globally. It's also expanding the scope of its U.S. political ads policy and clarifying its existing rules on misleading content and political ads.

Why it matters: The announcement comes a few weeks after Twitter announced it would be banning political ads. Facebook VP of Marketing Solutions Carolyn Everson told Axios Monday that the company is still considering changes to its ads policy and nothing, including changes to ads targeting, is off the table.

Go deeperArrowNov 20, 2019

Rivals distance themselves from Facebook on political ads

Illustration: Lazaro Gamio / Axios

Google, Facebook, Twitter and Snapchat all made new announcements this week adjusting their political ad policies, placing themselves on a broad spectrum from anything goes to a near-total ban.

Why it matters: Many social media companies are using the ongoing political ad debate to distance themselves from Facebook, which has received the most criticism for its policies. Facebook's rules are the least restrictive amongst the group, because the tech giant believes that the government should regulate political ads, not private companies.

Go deeperArrowNov 21, 2019