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The confederate soldier statue at the Albemarle County Court House along with the canons were removed on Saturday. Photo by John McDonnell/The Washington Post via Getty Images

The "At Ready" Confederate statute in Charlottesville, Virginia, was removed early on Saturday, 111 years after it was erected.

Why it matters: Charlottesville was the site of the deadly, far-right "Unite the Right" rally in August 2017, where a neo-Nazi rammed his car into a crowd of anti-racist protesters, killing 32-year-old Heather Heyer.

  • At the time, white supremacists and neo-Nazis descended on Charlottesville to protest the city's decision to remove a statue of Robert E Lee, which sits about a block from the "At Ready" statue.
  • A judge blocked the removal of the Lee statue, as well as one of Stonewall Jackson, earlier this year, but the state's Supreme Court plans to take up the case.
  • The removal of Confederate symbols has been a key issue in the ongoing protests against racism in the U.S.

Background: The "At Ready" statue was dedicated outside the Albemarle County Court House in 1909.

  • The monument depicted a Confederate soldier holding a rifle, along with two cannons and several cannonballs on either side.
  • Albermarle County was one of the first communities to go through the legal process to eliminate a war statue since the state passed a law earlier this year that authorizes localities to remove, relocate or cover war monuments and memorials.
  • The statue's removal Saturday was live-streamed on Facebook.

What they're saying: “It is with pride that the Albemarle County Board of Supervisors takes action to remove the 'At Ready' statue," said Ned Gallaway, chair of the Albemarle County board of supervisors.

  • "We know that taking this action is not some end point. We have a lot of work to do and that work is in our policy work, in affordable housing, in our schools — we know we have a long way to go. I’m looking forward to getting to that work," Gallaway said in a statement.

By the numbers:

  • A total of 115 Confederate symbols have been removed from public spaces since Dylann Roof, a white supremacist, shot dead nine Black worshippers at a Charleston, South Carolina, church, per the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC).
  • At least 30 of those have been removed since the police killing of George Floyd this May. Many removed symbols are now located on private land.
  • According to the SPLC, nearly 1,800 Confederate symbols remain on public land, including 739 monuments.

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