Acting Homeland Security Secretary Chad Wolf told ABC's "This Week" that "all options continue to be on the table" in terms of sending federal law enforcement into Portland to quell violent protests.

Why it matters: Tensions in Portland reached new heights after a person was killed on Saturday night during clashes between protesters and Trump supporters. Wolf could not share more details on the incident because the investigation is ongoing, but he called on local officials to allow federal law enforcement to step in.

Between the lines: Protesters in Portland repeatedly clashed with federal law enforcement officials earlier this summer, when the Department of Homeland Security deployed agents to protect the city's federal courthouse before beginning to phase them out in late July.

  • On Friday, Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler sent President Trump a letter rejecting his offer of federal assistance.

What he's saying: "I do understand that there were a number of counterprotests and countergroups in Portland overnight, and I think this points to a larger issue that we have seen in Portland for the last three months," Wolf said. "And that is local and state officials not allowing law enforcement to do their job and really to bring this violent activity night after night after night to a close."

  • "So as you see that continue to unfold over the course of three months, you'll continue to see violent activity, and we've asked the governor, we've asked the mayor to step in. They don't have the resources."
  • "The president has been very clear on this as you know. We will be happy to provide resources to bring this violence to an end. Violence that, again, across the ideological spectrum, left or right. The violence needs to end."

Go deeper

Felix Salmon, author of Capital
Sep 24, 2020 - Economy & Business

Why money laundering persists

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

2 million suspicious activity reports, or SARs, are filed by banks every year. Those reports are sent to the U.S. Treasury's Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN), which has the job of determining whether the reports are evidence of criminal activity, and whether that activity should be investigated and punished.

The catch: FinCEN only has 270 employees, which means that FinCEN is dealing with a ratio of roughly 150 reports per employee per week. So it comes as little surprise to learn that most of the reports go unread, and the activity in them unpunished.

Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 12 a.m. ET: 33,282,969 — Total deaths: 1,000,867 — Total recoveries: 23,066,203Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 12 a.m. ET: 7,148,009 — Total deaths: 205,069 — Total recoveries: 2,794,608 — Total tests: 102,342,416Map.
  3. Business: Companies are still holding back earnings guidance.
  4. Health: Trump announces plan to distribute 150 million rapid tests —The childless vaccine.
  5. Media: Fauci: Some of what Fox News reports about COVID-19 is "outlandish"
  6. States: Cuomo extends New York moratorium on evictions until 2021.
  7. World: More than 1 million people have now died from coronavirus — India the second country after U.S. to hit 6 million cases.

Bob Woodward: "I was not going to hide" my opinion on Trump

Bob Woodward didn't want to join Senate Republicans in privately condemning President Trump but declining to do so publicly, he told Jonathan Swan in an interview for "Axios on HBO."

Why it matters: Woodward has covered 9 presidents, but Trump is the first that Woodward explicitly described as "the wrong man for the job."

Get Axios AM in your inbox

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!