Jan 6, 2020

Amazon wants Fire TV in more cars and devices

Amazon Fire TV products. Photo: Dia Dipasupil/Getty Image

Amazon made a series of moves at CES in Las Vegas, most notably announcing deals to get its Fire TV software built into more televisions, soundbars and even the back seats of cars.

Why it matters: In tech, it pays to control the operating system. Amazon found itself on the outside looking in when it came to smartphones, and wants to maintain a strong position in smart TVs, speakers and other emerging consumer devices.

Driving the news:

  • Amazon's Fire TV Edition for Automotive will offer a roadmap for carmakers that want to put Amazon's TV software into back-seat entertainment systems. BMW and Fiat Chrysler Automotive will be among the first to offer such systems, Amazon said.
  • A similar program for internet service providers aims to make it easier for them to offer Fire TV Edition devices to their customers. Amazon is already working with Verizon in the U.S. and Tata in India.
  • Amazon said it expects more than 150 Fire TV Edition devices in more than 10 countries to be available by the end of the year.

Meanwhile: Amazon also announced its Ring unit is expanding further into home lighting, including the first Ring smart LED bulbs.

  • And Lamborghini is adding Alexa to its Huracán EVO this year.

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Amazon announces big earnings beat

Photo: Leon Neal/Getty Images

Amazon announced strong quarterly results Thursday after the market close, with $6.47 earnings per share on an expected $4.04 (per FactSet) and total revenue of $87.44 billion on $86.02 billion expected.

Why it matters: Wall Street has wondered whether Amazon's huge investments in one-day delivery and cloud services would depress its financial performance. This quarter, at least, gave investors a positive surprise.

The race to own the media experience in self-driving cars

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

One of the big themes at CES this year has been the race to own the media experience when cars go driverless.

Why it matters: The complications around who will own the data, how connectivity will work and what "driverless" actually means haven't stopped companies from making big announcements this year.

Go deeperArrowJan 7, 2020

Amazon touts favorable survey of small firms before House antitrust hearing

Photo: Thomas Samson/AFP via Getty Images

According to an Amazon-commissioned survey out Thursday, small businesses see revenue growth from selling on the platform and don't rely on Amazon alone for their online sales.

Why it matters: The survey results offer a touch of counter-programming for Amazon as it girds itself for criticism of its market power at a House antitrust subcommittee hearing Friday. That session features a small business that has publicly complained about the online retail giant's tactics.

Go deeperArrowJan 16, 2020