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Photo illustration: Rafael Henrique/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Next year's CES electronics show will be virtual, a reversal from earlier plans to press on with the event in person despite the coronavirus pandemic.

Why it matters: The CES trade show in Las Vegas each January is one of tech's biggest global events. Its cancellation as an in-person affair signals extended tech industry skepticism that the U.S. will return to normal by this winter.

What they're saying: "Amid the pandemic and growing global health concerns about the spread of COVID-19, it’s just not possible to safely convene tens of thousands of people in Las Vegas in early January 2021 to meet and do business in person," said Gary Shapiro, president and CEO of the Consumer Technology Association, which puts on CES.

  • Instead, product showcases and other aspects of the show will be strictly digital, Shapiro said.

Flashback: CES had previously been drawing up plans for keeping attendees socially distant during the intended gathering. Those are being scrapped as U.S. infections surge.

Our thought bubble: CTA was an outlier in pressing ahead, Axios' Ina Fried notes. Their initial announcement that the show would go on was greeted with widespread skepticism.

Go deeper ... Charted: Tech companies' work from home plans

Go deeper

Ina Fried, author of Login
Jul 28, 2020 - Technology

Tech companies' work from home plans due to the pandemic

Data: Axios reporting, company officials; Table: Naema Ahmed/Axios

Google announced on Monday it will let most employees work from home through mid-2021; here is a look at what the other big tech companies have (or in some cases haven't) said about their plans.

Why it matters: Nobody knows when it will be safe for a mass return to the office. Telling workers when they can expect to remain working from home allows them to make plans, especially with many school districts starting the year with remote learning.

Go deeper: Tech hits the brakes on office reopenings

Trump's coronavirus adviser Scott Atlas resigns

Photo: Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty

Scott Atlas, a controversial member of the White House coronavirus task force, handed in his resignation on Monday, according to three administration officials who discussed Atlas' resignation with Axios.

Why it matters: President Trump brought in Atlas as a counterpoint to NIAID director Anthony Fauci, whose warnings about the pandemic were dismissed by the Trump administration. With Trump now fixated on election fraud conspiracy theories, Atlas' detail comes to a natural end.

Dave Lawler, author of World
2 hours ago - World

Assassination in Iran sets stage for tense final 50 days of Trump

The funeral ceremony in Tehran. Photo: Iranian Defense Ministry via Getty

Iranian leaders are weighing their response to the assassination of Mohsen Fakhrizadeh, known as the father of Iran’s military nuclear program, who was given a state funeral Monday in Tehran.

The big picture: Iran has accused Israel of carrying out Friday’s attack, but senior leaders have suggested that they’ll choose patience over an immediate escalation that could play into the hands of the Israelis and the outgoing Trump administration.

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