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Census materials. Photo Illustration: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Despite the disruptions from the coronavirus outbreak, the Census Bureau says its self-reporting numbers for 2020 are on track.

Why it matters: The census determines how federal funding is allocated across state and local governments, including funding for emergency response and public health infrastructure.

  • Wednesday is the reference date for responses, meaning you should include everyone living in your household as of April 1 when filling out the form.

Where it stands: As of Tuesday, about 50 million households — a national response rate of 34.7% — have responded to the census, said Michael Cook, chief of the U.S. Census Bureau's Public Information Office.

Yes, but: Since the Census Bureau has delayed fieldwork and hiring of field staff, there's a concern that people will mistakenly think that the national count is no longer happening due to the coronavirus shutdowns.

  • For example, the bureau has not been able to visit college campuses to ensure students respond. And many students have returned home or are staying with friends — causing confusion about which address to report.
  • Cook says students should use the address where they usually live during the semester.

The biggest hurdles are trying to reach the historically hard-to-count populations, including those who speak English as a second language, black men between the ages of 18 and 29, and children under five years old.

Digital communications are filling the void left by the delay in hiring field workers and in-person events. Cook said the bureau is relying heavily on TV, radio and social media ads to remind people to take action.

  • New York City is using peer-to-peer texting to send reminders, and it quickly converted ads on the subway (which is empty these days) to digital and media ads.

Go deeper: This year's census may be the toughest count yet

Go deeper

3 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Trump to issue at least 100 pardons and commutations before leaving office

Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

President Trump plans to issue at least 100 pardons and commutations on his final full day in office Tuesday, sources familiar with the matter told Axios.

Why it matters: This is a continuation of the president's controversial December spree that saw full pardons granted to more than two dozen people — including former Trump campaign chair Paul Manafort, longtime associate Roger Stone and Charles Kushner, the father of Trump's senior adviser and son-in-law, Jared Kushner.

  • The pardons set to be issued before Trump exits the White House will be a mix of criminal justice ones and pardons for people connected to the president, the sources said.
  • CNN first reported this news.

Go deeper: Convicts turn to D.C. fixers for Trump pardons

Schumer's m(aj)ority checklist

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer. Photo: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

Capitalizing on the Georgia runoffs, achieving a 50-50 Senate and launching an impeachment trial are weighty to-dos for getting Joe Biden's administration up and running on Day One.

What to watch: A blend of ceremonies, hearings and legal timelines will come into play on Tuesday and Wednesday so Chuck Schumer can actually claim the Senate majority and propel the new president's agenda.

The dark new reality in Congress

National Guard troops keep watch at security fencing. Photo: Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

This is how bad things are for elected officials and others working in a post-insurrection Congress:

  • Rep. Norma Torres (D-Calif.) said she had a panic attack while grocery shopping back home.
  • Rep. Jim McGovern (D-Mass.) said police may also have to be at his constituent meetings.
  • Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-Ill.) told a podcaster he brought a gun to his office on Capitol Hill on Jan. 6 because he anticipated trouble with the proceedings that day.

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