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Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

Fully vaccinated people can travel domestically and internationally without having to show a negative COVID-19 test or quarantining, but are still recommended to wear a mask and follow public health precautions, according to updated guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Why it matters: It's a major incentive for Americans to get vaccinated that will also provide a boost to the U.S. travel industry, which has been financially hammered by the pandemic over the past year.

  • Many states had previously required travelers to quarantine upon arrival in order to curb the spread of the virus.
  • Some countries also required Americans to show proof of a negative coronavirus test upon arrival or at time of departure.

Yes, but: The CDC still recommends that vaccinated people get tested 3-5 days after traveling internationally, since it's not yet fully clear whether they can carry the virus and transmit it to others.

  • Vaccinated Americans are also still required to follow other countries' requirements with regards to testing and quarantining when traveling internationally.

The big picture: The CDC and the White House have been asked repeatedly what fully vaccinated people can do with regards to travel. Earlier in the year, CDC Director Rochelle Walensky said there were not enough Americans yet vaccinated for the CDC to decide cross-country travel guidance.

  • The new guidelines also follow a CDC announcement last month that fully vaccinated people can gather with small groups indoors — without masks — and still be safe.

By the numbers: Almost 40% of adults in the U.S. have received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine, according to the CDC. Over a fifth of adults in the country are fully vaccinated.

This story is breaking news. Please check back for updates.

Go deeper

14 mins ago - World

Israel's "change bloc" collapses, leaving Netanyahu in charge

Bennett (L) with Netanyahu in 2015. Photo: Gali Tibbon/AFP via Getty Images

In a dramatic shift that comes amid fighting in the Gaza strip and clashes between Jewish and Arab citizens in Israel, right-wing kingmaker Naftali Bennett has announced he will no longer seek an alternative government to oust Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.

Why it matters: Bennett had been on the verge of a power-sharing deal with centrist opposition leader Yair Lapid that would have made him prime minister for two years until Lapid rotated into the job. Without Bennett, Lapid has no path to a majority, and Israel will almost certainly head for its fifth election since 2019 with Netanyahu still in his post.

CDC says fully vaccinated people don't have to wear masks indoors

CDC Director Rochelle Walensky. Photo: Erin Clark-Pool/Getty Images

The CDC announced in new guidance Thursday that anyone who is fully vaccinated can participate in indoor and outdoor activities without wearing a mask or physically distancing, regardless of crowd size.

What they're saying: "If you are fully vaccinated, you are protected, and you can start doing the things that you stopped doing because of the pandemic," CDC Director Rochelle Walensky will say at a White House press briefing.