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Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vial and box seen at a vaccination site. Photo: Paul Hennessy/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

An advisory panel for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Friday recommended that the U.S. resume use of the Johnson & Johnson coronavirus vaccine, saying the benefits of the shot outweigh the risk of a rare blood clot disorder.

Why it matters: The move likely paves the way for the U.S. to lift its recommended pause on the one-shot vaccine. The Biden administration has said it will take the panel's recommendations into account as it makes a determination on the vaccine's use.

  • The panel's vote on Friday was 10-4 in favor of recommending the use of J&J's vaccine for "persons 18 years of age and older in the U.S. population under the FDA's Emergency Use Authorization." One member abstained.
  • Johnson & Johnson said it supported adding a warning label to its shot. The language for the label has been agreed upon with the Food and Drug Administration, the company noted.

The big picture: The FDA on April 13 recommended an immediate halt to the use of the J&J vaccine, citing cases of a rare blood clot disorder that six women developed within two weeks of receiving the shot.

  • All 50 states, Washington, D.C., and Puerto Rico paused or recommended a halt on the use of that vaccine.
  • The CDC said Friday that at least nine additional women have developed blood clots, but that the chances of people developing the disorder remains extremely low.
  • Three women have died of the rare blood clots, and seven remain hospitalized, the CDC told the advisory panel Friday.
  • About 8 million doses of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine have been administered so far, per the CDC.

What to watch: The FDA is expected to soon make its decision on Johnson & Johnson vaccine pause.

Go deeper

Caitlin Owens, author of Vitals
Apr 23, 2021 - Health

The bad news about the J&J pause

Expand chart
Data: Harris Poll; Chart: Will Chase/Axios

Publicity surrounding the Johnson & Johnson vaccine's possible link to blood clots has had a negative effect on overall public opinion on vaccines, according to new Harris polling.

By the numbers: 54% of respondents said they wouldn't be willing to take the J&J vaccine in the future, even if its use is given the go-ahead by federal regulators.

Apr 23, 2021 - Health

EU drug regulator recommends administering 2nd AstraZeneca dose

Photo: Guillermo Guterrez Carrascal/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

The European Medical Agency (EMA) said on Friday that people who received the first dose of the AstraZeneca coronavirus vaccine should get the second one, reiterating that the benefits of the shot outweigh the risks.

The big picture: EMA's decision comes after several countries suspended the use of the AstraZeneca vaccine due to the agency's assessment of a "possible link" between the shot and rare blood clots. EMA recommended the condition be listed as a "very rare" side effect.

Caitlin Owens, author of Vitals
Apr 23, 2021 - Health

The next generation of coronavirus vaccines won't come as quickly

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

A flood of cash from Operation Warp Speed helped coax a slew of biotech companies into the race for a coronavirus vaccine, but the incentives to keep working on new competitors won't be nearly as strong.

Why it matters: That initial flood of cash worked — it delivered multiple, highly effective vaccines in record time. In other disease areas, though, second- and third-generation vaccines usually become the dominant products. And the first COVID-19 vaccines aren't necessarily a great fit for the whole world.