Mar 13, 2017

CBO Trumpcare estimate: 24 million would lose coverage

Data: Congressional Budget Office; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon / Axios

The Congressional Budget Office bomb has gone off. Here's what it says about the House Republican Obamacare replacement plan:

  • Coverage: 24 million fewer than Obamacare in 10 years (14 million in 2018)
  • Savings: $337 billion in deficit reduction over 10 years
  • Premiums: 15 to 20 percent higher in 2018-19; 10 percent lower in 10 years

What it means: It's not a surprise that CBO predicted people would lose coverage — most health care experts predicted it, and Republicans have been prepared for it. They've insisted they're not trying to compete with Obamacare, which required people to buy coverage. But today's estimates are worse than expected — the Brookings Institution predicted the number losing coverage would be 15 million over 10 years.

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Deficit balloons to $356.6 billion in first quarter of fiscal year

Photo: Bloomberg Creative Photos/Getty Images

The U.S. budget deficit hit $356.6 billion in the first quarter of fiscal year 2020, up 11.8% compared to the same period the previous year, Bloomberg reports.

Why it matters: The deficit, which President Trump pledged in 2016 to eliminate within eight years, is on pace to exceed $1 trillion by the end of 2020. The U.S. has not seen $1 trillion annual deficits since the three years that followed the 2008 financial crisis, per the New York Times.

Go deeperArrowJan 13, 2020

State and local officials fight to keep Medicaid for inmates

Angola prison in Louisiana. Photo: Giles Clarke/Getty Images

Some local and state officials want Medicaid to start picking up the tab for inmates' health care, Stateline reports.

How it works: Medicaid beneficiaries lose their coverage while they're incarcerated — including pretrial detention for people who can't make bail — and county governments are generally responsible for providing their care.

Go deeperArrowJan 9, 2020

Despite Trump, Congress boosts clean energy funding

Congress is set to pass a budget doubling down on a years-long trend of increasing clean-energy funding, despite President Trump's repeated attempts to cut spending.

Driving the news: The spending bill the House passed on Tuesday would increase energy research spending nearly 14% compared to this year’s levels and more than 50% compared to 2014.

Go deeperArrowDec 18, 2019