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Cover courtesy of Regnery Publishing

In his new book — soon to make the Fox News/opinion circuit — former Trump campaign adviser Carter Page details his 2016 trip to Russia to deliver a commencement speech at the New Economic School (NES), which later became a subject of keen interest to the FBI.

Between the lines: On Tuesday, the Senate Intelligence Committee released the final volume of its Russia report, which revealed Page “was likely a subject of interest to Russian officials during the 2016 election, given that he was the only member of the Trump Campaign's foreign policy advisory team publicly identified as a Russia expert.”

  • The report stated that Page's invitation to speak at the Russian school "was extended because of the Russian sponsors' perception of his role in the Trump campaign.”

Excerpt:

"Shlomo Weber, a professor of economics in Russia and at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, invited me to speak to the graduating class of 2016 at the New Economic School in Moscow—an event independent of my work with the campaign." ...
"I ran the invitation by Corey Lewandowski to make sure that the campaign didn’t see any issues with it and suggested that perhaps Donald Trump might want to speak in my place. It was a well organized venue in which the candidate could display his foreign policy credentials. Presidential candidates often use foreign trips to showcase what they would look like as America’s head of state abroad." ...Corey replied to my email: “If you want to do this, it would be outside of your role with the DJT for President campaign. I am certain Mr. Trump will not be able to attend.”...
"For inviting me to give the speech, Shlomo Weber would later be interrogated by the FBI at “Madeline’s Cafe” [sic] in Dallas. The following July he joined a long list of other academics, many holding American passports, who would be interrogated about their interactions with the infamous Carter Page."
— Carter Page in his forthcoming book, " Abuse and Power: How an Innocent American Was Framed in an Attempted Coup Against the President"

Go deeper: Read the full excerpt

Go deeper

Trump adviser Corey Lewandowski tests positive for coronavirus

Corey Lewandowski. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Corey Lewandowski, a senior adviser for President Trump's re-election campaign, has tested positive for the coronavirus, the New York Times reported. Lewandowski confirmed to CNN that he tested positive.

Why it matters: Lewandowski is the latest person to test positive after he attended last week's White House election night party. His diagnosis comes after Chief of Staff Mark Meadows and Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson tested positive for the virus.

Dan Primack, author of Pro Rata
10 mins ago - Economy & Business

Why fears of a SPAC bubble may be overblown

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

The SPAC surge continues unabated, with 10 new ones formed since Wednesday morning. And that's OK.

Between the lines: There are growing concerns that retail investors are about to get rolled, with smart sponsors taking advantage of dumb money.

Schumer says Senate will stay through weekend to vote on COVID relief

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) accused Sen. Ron Johnson (R-Wis.) of going to "ridiculous lengths" to show his opposition to a COVID relief package widely supported by the American public, after Johnson demanded that the entire 600-page bill be read on the Senate floor.

The state of play: Johnson's procedural move will likely add 10 hours to the 20 hours already allotted for debate, during which Republicans will propose amendments to force uncomfortable votes for Democrats. Schumer promised that the Senate will stay in session "no matter how long it takes" to finish voting on the $1.9 trillion rescue package.

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