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A U.S. Capitol police officer talks to supporters of US President Donald Trump, including Jacob Chansley, also known as Jake Angeli (R), a QAnon supporter known for his painted face and horned hat, on Jan. 6. Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

The top federal prosecutor in Washington, D.C., said Friday that there is "no direct evidence of kill and capture teams" among Capitol rioters, walking back claims by federal prosecutors in Arizona, who said in court documents that rioters sought to "capture and assassinate elected officials," per USA Today.

The state of play: The prosecutors in Arizona made the claims in a detention memo late Thursday against Jacob Chansley — the man photographed wearing horns while standing at Vice President Mike Pence's desk in the Senate chambers. The U.S. Attorney's Office in Arizona told Reuters prosecutors plan to file an amended memo later Friday.

  • Acting U.S. Attorney Michael Sherwin said Friday that there may have been a “disconnect” between his office, which is leading the prosecution effort, and local offices on the evidence obtained so far in the cases, per Reuters.

The big picture: The FBI is tracking over 200 suspects related to the breach at the Capitol. While many are being detained and charged over acts of physical violence, Chansley's charges "involve active participation in an insurrection attempting to violently overthrow the United States government."

  • Prosecutors note that mental illness and drug abuse may contribute to his behavior.

Go deeper

Off the Rails

Trump turns on Pence

Photo illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios. Photos: Elijah Nouvelage, Alex Wong/Getty Images

"The end is coming, Donald."

The male voice in the TV ad boomed through the White House residence during "Fox & Friends" commercial breaks. Over and over and over. "The end is coming, Donald. ... On Jan. 6, Mike Pence will put the nail in your political coffin."

Feds say Iran scholar was secret Tehran agent

Iran Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif, the beneficiary of one ghostwritten column. Photo: Cem Ozdel/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

A prominent Iranian-born scholar arrested Monday was secretly paid to write columns favorable to Tehran and lobby at least one U.S. lawmaker on its behalf, federal prosecutors say.

Why it matters: Kaveh Afrasiabi’s writings showed up in prominent publications such as the New York Times and The Guardian as he drew regular payments from the Iranian government and communicated frequently with the country’s diplomatic staff, per the Justice Department. None of these professional or financial conflicts was disclosed.

Home confinees face imminent return to prison

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Thousands of prisoners who've been in home confinement for as long as a year because of the pandemic face returning to prison when it's over — unless President Biden rescinds a last-minute Trump Justice Department memo.

Why it matters: Most prisoners were told they would not have to come back as they were released early with ankle bracelets. Now, their lives are on hold while they wait to see whether or when they may be forced back behind bars. Advocates say about 4,500 people are affected.