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Sen. Al Franken, D-Minn., leaves the Capitol on Thursday after announcing his plans to resign. Photo: Andrew Harnik / AP

We have finally found something Republicans and Democrats have in common. Sadly, it's their shared culture of sexual harassment — and the worst form of abuse of power by old, perverted men:

  • Neil King, former Wall Street Journal deputy bureau chief, tweets that he's hearing the total number of congressmen with sexual-harassment skeletons "may top 40."
  • USA Today's banner: "Congress reels from resignations."
  • Many lawmakers are scared that Sen. Al Franken (D-Minn.) set a new threshold for resignation.
  • Last evening, Rep. Trent Franks, "the dean of Arizona's House Republicans, announced he is stepping down after learning the House Ethics Committee was investigating him for sexual harassment involving two 'previous female subordinates.'" (Resignation letter.)
  • Facing allegations of sexual harassment, Republican Rep. Blake Farenthold of Texas and Democratic Rep. Ruben Kihuen of Nevada have so far resisted calls to step down. Republican Rep. Joe Barton of Texas said he won't seek re-election next year.

Life lesson: Most men are good men. They treat women with respect and dignity. They work hard, set good examples, and do the right even when no one is looking.

Be smart: It's sad testament to our times that we need to be reminded of this. But I'm grateful to be surrounded by great role models — women and men.

Subscribe to Axios AM/PM for a daily rundown of what's new and why it matters, directly from Mike Allen.
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Go deeper

Republicans pledge to set aside differences and work with Biden

President Biden speaks to Sen. Mitch McConnell after being sworn in at the West Front of the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday. Photo: Erin Schaff-Pool/Getty Images

Several Republicans praised President Biden's calls for unity during his inaugural address on Wednesday and pledged to work together for the benefit of the American people.

Why it matters: The Democrats only have a slim majority in the Senate and Biden will likely need to work with the GOP to pass his legislative agenda.

The Biden protection plan

Joe Biden announces his first run for the presidency in June 1987. Photo: Howard L. Sachs/CNP/Getty Images

The Joe Biden who became the 46th president on Wednesday isn't the same blabbermouth who failed in 1988 and 2008.

Why it matters: Biden now heeds guidance about staying on task with speeches and no longer worries a gaffe or two will cost him an election. His staff also limits the places where he speaks freely and off the cuff. This Biden protective bubble will only tighten in the months ahead, aides tell Axios.

Bush labels Clyburn the “savior” for Democrats

House Majority Whip James Clyburn takes a selfie Wednesday with former President George W. Bush. Photo: Patrick Semansky-Pool/Getty Images

Former President George W. Bush credited Rep. James Clyburn with being the "savior" of the Democratic Party, telling the South Carolinian at Wednesday's inauguration his endorsement allowed Joe Biden to win the party's presidential nomination.

Why it matters: The nation's last two-term Republican president also said Clyburn's nod allowed for the transfer of power, because he felt only Biden had the ability to unseat President Trump.