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Photo: Istock/rgbspace

You don't have to smoke, eat or vape it. Now, you can smear it on your body.

The big picture: CBD skincare products — which claim to hydrate, moisturize, cure acne, reduce wrinkles and even combat aging — are a big market, but nobody knows for sure if they really work.

Big dollars: The growing market of cannabis-infused skincare products could generate $25 billion in revenue in the next decade, according to an analysis by Jefferies, the Wall Street bank.

  • Beauty and retail giants are trying to cash in on the hype: Just step into your nearest American Eagle, Sephora or CVS for CBD-infused lip balms, mascaras and moisturizers.
  • A search for "cannabis" on Sephora’s website yields 38 products, including a popular $100 "Royal Oil" from Lord Jones that claims “oils so pure, they retain the original aroma of the cannabis plant.”
  • Then there are luxury brands like Nannette de Gaspé, which stocks a $325 Bain Noir Cannabis Sativa Bath Soak Treatment.

How it works: CBD can be extracted from marijuana or from another strain of cannabis — hemp. The 2018 farm bill legalized cannabis products with less than 0.3% THC for the first time, green-lighting hemp. This makes the hemp-derived CBD in most beauty products legal in all 50 states.

But CBD skincare products have “outpaced our scientific understanding,” according to a recent study to be published in Clinics in Dermatology.

  • Joshua Zeichner, director of cosmetic and clinical research in the department of dermatology at Mount Sinai Hospital, tells Axios a lot of research is being conducted right now on CBD oil and it "will likely have widespread uses in dermatology."

The bottom line: One study found cannabis seeds extract cream helped men with acne while another found some anti-inflammatory effects. But there haven't been any large-scale human trials on the efficacy of CBD in skincare.

Go deeper:

Go deeper

9 mins ago - Health

CDC extends interval between COVID vaccine doses for exceptional cases

Photo: Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty

Patients can space out the two doses of the coronavirus vaccine by up to six weeks if it’s "not feasible" to follow the shorter recommended window, according to updated guidance from the Centers for Disease and Control and Prevention.

Driving the news: With the prospect of vaccine shortages and a low likelihood that supply will expand before April, the latest changes could provide a path to vaccinate more Americans — a top priority for President Biden.

Texas AG sues Biden administration over deportation freeze

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton speaks to members of the media in 2016. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton is suing the Biden administration in federal district court over its 100-day freeze on deporting unauthorized immigrants, and he's asking for a temporary restraining order.

Between the lines: The freeze went into effect Friday, temporarily halting most immigration enforcement in the U.S. In the lawsuit, Paxton claims the move "violates the U.S. Constitution, federal immigration and administrative law, and a contractual agreement between Texas" and the Department of Homeland Security.

Dan Primack, author of Pro Rata
3 hours ago - Podcasts

Carbon Health's CEO on unsticking the vaccine bottleneck

President Biden has said that getting Americans vaccinated for COVID-19 is his administration’s top priority given an initial rollout plagued by organizational, logistical and technical glitches.

Axios Re:Cap digs into the bottlenecks and how to unclog them with Carbon Health chief executive Eren Bali, whose company recently began helping to manage vaccinations in Los Angeles.

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