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California Gov. Gavin Newsom speaking in Los Angeles in 2019. Photo: Agustin Paullier/AFP via Getty Images

California Gov. Gavin Newsom (D) on Wednesday signed collection of policing bills that outlaw the use of chokeholds, allow the state Department of Justice to investigate police shootings and give counties added oversight of sheriff's departments, according to a statement from his office.

Why it matters: The laws add to the wave of reform bills introduced across the U.S. after the May police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis. Newsom also signed bills related to the state's juvenile justice system and legal protections.

What they're saying: “Americans across the country took to the streets this summer rightfully demanding more and better of our criminal justice system — and of ourselves,” Newsom said.

  • “We heard those calls for action loud and clear and today are advancing reforms to improve policing practices by ending the carotid hold and requiring independent investigations in officer-involved shootings."

Go deeper

Columbus, Ohio, police officer fatally shoots unarmed Black man

People hold up signs in Columbus, Ohio, during a Dec. 11 march for Casey Goodson Jr., a 23-year-old Black man, who was shot and killed by law enforcement. Photo: Stephen Zenner/AFP via Getty Images

A Columbus, Ohio, police officer was relieved of duty following the fatal shooting of a 47-year-old Black man Tuesday during which he did not activate his body camera, Mayor Andrew Ginther (D) announced.

Why it matters: The shooting of the unnamed man comes after the Dec. 4 death of Casey Goodson, Jr., a 23-year-old Black man who was shot and killed by a sheriff's deputy, which triggered protests against police brutality.

2 hours ago - World

Special report: Trump's U.S.-China transformation

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

President Trump began his term by launching the trade war with China he had promised on the campaign trail. By mid-2020, however, Trump was no longer the public face of China policy-making as he became increasingly consumed with domestic troubles, giving his top aides carte blanche to pursue a cascade of tough-on-China policies.

Why it matters: Trump alone did not reshape the China relationship. But his trade war shattered global norms, paving the way for administration officials to pursue policies that just a few years earlier would have been unthinkable.

McConnell: Trump "provoked" Capitol mob

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) said on Tuesday that the pro-Trump mob that stormed the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6 was "provoked by the president and other powerful people."

Why it matters: Trump was impeached by the House last week for "incitement of insurrection." McConnell has not said how he will vote in Trump's coming Senate impeachment trial, but sources told Axios' Mike Allen that the chances of him voting to convict are higher than 50%.