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Gov. Gavin Newsom in Los Angeles on June 3. Photo: Genaro Molina/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

California Gov. Gavin Newsom directed state police to stop using the carotid "sleeper" chokehold on Friday, after 11 days of nationwide protest over the killing of George Floyd.

Driving the news: Newsom's instruction to state police to stop teaching the hold, which restricts blood flow to the brain to render someone unconscious, comes in the wake of Minneapolis also banning police chokeholds.

Context: Derek Chauvin, a Minneapolis police officer, knelt on Floyd's neck for nearly nine minutes, according to Hennepin County Attorney Mike Freeman.

  • Eric Garner, an unarmed black man who allegedly sold cigarettes outside a convenience store, died in 2014 after a New York Police Department officer restrained him in an illegal chokehold during an arrest.

What he's saying: “We will not sit back passively as a state," Newsom said in a statement. "I am proud that California has advanced a new conversation about broader criminal justice reform, but we have an extraordinary amount of work left to do to manifest a cultural change and a deeper understanding of what it is that we’re working to advance."

  • “We train techniques on strangleholds that put people’s lives at risk,” Newsom told reporters on Friday, per AP. “That has no place any longer in 21st-century practices and policing.”

Go deeper: Biden compares "tragic" death of George Floyd to Eric Garner

Go deeper

Updated Sep 7, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Rochester mayor vows to reform police after Daniel Prude's death

Demonstrators in Rochester, New York. Photo: Tayfun Coskun/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Lovely Warren, mayor of Rochester, New York, pledged reforms to the city's police as protests continued Sunday over the death of Daniel Prude, a Black man who was experiencing mental health issues when he was detained.

Driving the news: Prude died seven days after being hooded and held down by Rochester police. Police Chief La’Ron Singletary said at a news conference with Warren that he supported the changes and he was "dedicated to taking the necessary actions to prevent this from ever happening again."

Dan Primack, author of Pro Rata
2 hours ago - Health

Moderna exec says children could be vaccinated by mid-2021

Tal Zaks, chief medical officer of Moderna, tells "Axios on HBO" that a COVID-19 vaccine could be available for children by the middle of next year.

Be smart: There will be a coronavirus vaccine for adults long before there is one for kids.

Updated 3 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Sen. Kelly Loeffler to return to campaign trail after 2nd negative test

Sen. Kelly Loeffler addresses supporters during a rally on Thursday. Photo: Jessica McGowan/Getty Images

Sen. Kelly Loeffler's (R-Ga.) campaign announced Monday that she "looks forward to getting back out on the campaign trail" after testing negative for COVID-19 for a second time, following earlier conflicting results.

Why it matters: Loeffler has been campaigning at events ahead of a Jan. 5 runoff in elections that'll decide which party holds the Senate majority. Vice President Mike Pence was with her on Friday.