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Via L.A. Times

"California is being pushed to extremes," the L.A. Times reports in today's lead story. "And the record heat, fires and pollution all have one thing in common: They were made worse by climate change."

Why it matters: "Their convergence is perhaps the strongest signal yet that the calamity climate scientists have warned of for years isn’t far off in the future; it is here today and can no longer be ignored."

  • Climate scientist Zeke Hausfather said: "People who have lived in California for 30, 40 years are saying this is unprecedented, it has never been this hot, it has never been this smoky."

The big picture ... California Gov. Gavin Newsom (D), on Friday: "California, folks, is America — fast forward." (hat tip: ABC's "This Week")

Photo: Nick Otto for The Washington Post, via Getty Images

This photo of downtown San Francisco was taken at 11:15 a.m. Wednesday, with the city blanketed in an eerie haze from wildfires.

The WashPost pulls back the camera and declares, "The California Dream has become the California Compromise":

  • The San Francisco cityscape "resembles the surface of a distant planet, populated by a masked alien culture. The air, choked with blown ash, is difficult to breathe."
  • "There is the Golden Gate Bridge, looming in the distance through a drift-smoke haze, and the Salesforce Tower, which against the blood-orange sky appears as a colossal spaceship in a doomsday film."

What's next, per The Post: "California has become a warming, burning, epidemic-challenged and expensive state, with many who live in sophisticated cities, idyllic oceanfront towns and windblown mountain communities thinking hard about the viability of a place they have called home forever."

  • "For the first time in a decade, more people left California last year for other states than arrived."
Via CNN

Go deeper

GM abandons Trump lawsuit against California over emissions standards

General Motors CEO Mary Barra speaks at GM headquarters June 12, 2018 in Detroit, MI. Photo: Bill Pugliano/Getty Images

General Motors will pull out of any legal efforts that seek to strip California of its right to set its own clean-air standards, GM CEO Mary Barra said in a letter Monday to environmental groups, per AP.

Driving the news: Barra said the company, which is developing a new battery chemistry that will reduce the costs of electric-vehicle, agrees with President-elect Joe Biden’s plan to expand the use of electric vehicles, AP reported.

Erica Pandey, author of @Work
2 hours ago - World

Remote work shakes up geopolitics

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

The global adoption of remote work may leave the rising powers in the East behind.

The big picture: Despite India's and China's economic might, these countries have far fewer remote jobs than the U.S. or Europe. That's affecting the emerging economies' resilience amid the pandemic.

Trump gives Biden access to presidential intelligence briefings

Photo: Mark Makela/Getty Images

The Trump White House on Tuesday gave President-elect Biden access to daily presidential intelligence briefings, a source familiar with the matter tells Axios.

Why it matters: Trump has refused to share the briefs until now, as he continues to challenge the result of the election and declines to concede. The president's acquiescence comes as another sign that the transition to a Biden administration is taking place.