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Business Insider

Beginning Tuesday, Business Insider's logo will no longer appear on Insider.com's website, the publication's CEO and founder Henry Blodget tells Axios.

Why it matters: The changes signal Blodget's ambition to grow the publication significantly to reach a broader population, and that includes investing in verticals outside of traditional business coverage, like politics, travel and lifestyle.

Catch up quick: The name change is the latest evolution in the publication's nearly 15-year history. Blodget started Silicon Alley Insider in 2007 and later changed the name to "The Business Insider" to widen its scope of coverage.

  • Blodget says the team decided in 2016 when it launched "Insider" as a corresponding lifestyle brand that it would eventually phase out Business Insider's name.
  • It's since taken many steps to stitch together its "Insider" brand with "Business Insider" on the backend, including combining CMS publishing systems, matching the site formats and combining the editorial and tech teams from both titles.
  • Eventually, the URL for Business Insider will be redirected to Insider, but there will still be a dedicated business landing page.

Yes, but: Business will remain a core focus. "We plan to significantly increase investments in our business coverage," Blodget says.

  • Nicholas Carlson, the Global Editor-in-Chief of Insider, tells Axios that business and tech coverage are the core of the company's subscription strategy. The company launched a paywall in 2017.
  • He says building on those core verticals is a priority, but the company is already beginning to "carefully add" other pillars, like politics. "We've seen good returns on it already in terms of numbers of subscriptions," he says.
  • Carlson has been with the publication since its inception as Silicon Alley Insider. He helped co-found Insider Inc. in 2016 and has since led the franchise.
  • "A big part of my mission was to bring Insider and Business Insider together."

By the numbers: The combined newsroom includes 500 journalists globally.

  • Blodget says the goal is to build Insider into the next-generation global publishing giant online, akin to what CNN built via cable or what The Wall Street Journal and New York Times built in print.
  • "Internally, the objective over the next 5 years is to reach a billion people online per month, have a million subscribers and a thousand journalists," Blodget says.
  • Carlson says the company plans to hire another 100 journalists this year.

The big picture: Business Insider has thrived since it was acquired by Axel Springer in 2015.

  • In October, Insider, Inc. acquired a majority stake in Morning Brew, a media startup that focuses on business newsletters and podcasts.
  • Blodget tells Axios that the company is still eyeing lots of potential acquisitions.

What's next: Carlson says the company will continue to focus on its core verticals
of business and tech, but will also invest in widening its coverage of other beats, — like politics, digital culture, and travel — in the near future. The company is also building out a team to cover issues of race around the world.

  • Other topics Carlson is excited about include religion, relationships, and parenting.
  • "A lot of the business and tech investments will be international," Blodget says, noting that half of the company's audience comes from overseas. Insider has 14 local editions in 8 different languages.
  • The goal is to be "a trusted source of truth in a confusing world," says Carlson.

Go deeper

Emergency declaration issued in 17 states and D.C. over fuel pipeline cyberattack

Photo: Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The Biden administration said it's "working with" fuel pipeline operator Colonial Pipeline to try and restart operations after a ransomware attack took it offline.

Why it matters: Friday night's cyberattack is "the most significant, successful attack on energy infrastructure" known to have occurred in the U.S., notes energy researcher Amy Myers Jaffe, per Politico. A regional emergency

17 mins ago - World

Sullivan expresses "serious concerns" to Israeli counterpart about Jerusalem violence

Israeli soldiers throw tear gas canisters at Palestinian demonstrators during a protest near the Jewish settlement of Beit El near Ramallah, in the occupied West Bank, on Sunday. Photo: Abbas Momani/AFP via Getty Images

U.S. National Security Adviser Jake Sullivan expressed "serious concerns" Sunday to his Israeli counterpart about "violent confrontations" in Jerusalem and planned evictions of Palestinian families from their homes in the city's east, per a White House statement.

Driving the news: More than 250 Palestinians and several Israeli police officers have been wounded since Friday. Israeli police have used tear gas, stun grenades, water cannons and rubber bullets on protesters, who've thrown "rocks and water bottles" at officers, per NPR. The violence continued Sunday night, AP notes.

Ina Fried, author of Login
Updated 4 hours ago - Technology

Exclusive: GLAAD finds top social media sites "categorically unsafe"

The leading social media sites — Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, TikTok and YouTube — are all "categorically unsafe" for LGBTQ people, according to a new study from GLAAD, the results of which were revealed Sunday on "Axios on HBO."

The big picture: GLAAD had planned to give each of the sites a grade as part of its inaugural social media index, but opted not to give individual grades this year after determining all the leading sites would receive a failing grade.