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Photo: AaronP/Bauer-Griffin/GC Images via Getty

Several corporations and tech giants are restricting or suspending political contributions after the siege on the Capitol.

Why it matters: The politics of pandering to the mob have become too dangerous for many of America's business leaders.

What's happening:

  • Charles Schwab is shutting down its PAC. (Schwab, the company's chairman, has given millions to pro-Trump and GOP groups, as the New York Times reports).
  • Nike "will not support any member of Congress ... who voted to decertify the Electoral College results" through its PAC, the company said in a statement.
  • Walt Disney Company will pause political contributions in 2021 to lawmakers who voted to reject certification of Electoral College votes. “The insurrection at our nation’s Capitol was a direct assault on one of our country’s most revered tenets: the peaceful transition of power," a spokesperson told Axios.
  • Facebook, Microsoft and Google are all pausing political spending.
  • Walmart's PAC is "indefinitely suspending contributions to those members of Congress who voted against the lawful certification of state electoral college votes," spokesperson Randy Hargrove told Axios in a statement.
  • Aerospace giant Northrop Grumman is pausing its PAC donations and "evaluating the way forward," spokesperson Tim Paynter told Defense News.
  • Comcast said it was suspending political contributions to elected officials who challenged the certification of Electoral College votes.
  • Verizon also said it was suspending political contributions to lawmakers who protested the Electoral College results.
  • Amazon said, "given the unacceptable attempt to undermine a legitimate democratic process, the Amazon PAC has suspended contributions to any member of Congress who voted to override the results of the U.S. presidential election."
  • BP's employee PAC will pause all contributions for six months and reevaluate its criteria for candidate support.
  • AT&T's Federal PAC board decided to suspend contributions to members of Congress who objected to the certification of Electoral College votes.
  • JPMorgan Chase is pausing all giving to both parties for six months. "The country is facing unprecedented health, economic and political crises," said Peter Scher, chair of the Mid-Atlantic Region and head of corporate responsibility. "There will be plenty of time for campaigning later."
  • Citi's head of global government affairs, Candi Wolff, said in a letter to colleagues that the bank will pause all contributions in Q1, and that after that, "[W]e will not support candidates who do not respect the rule of law."
  • Marriott International said the hotel giant will pause donations "to those who voted against certification of the election."
  • Blue Cross Blue Shield Association said it will suspend contributions to "lawmakers who voted to undermine our democracy" by challenging Electoral College results.
  • Boston Scientific, the medical device maker, is pausing all federal gifts.
  • Goldman Sachs is freezing donations through its PAC. The company told The New York Times it will conduct “a thorough assessment of how people acted during this period."
  • Dow, the chemical giant, told Bloomberg it will not donate to lawmakers who voted against the certification for one election cycle — two years for those in the House and six years for senators.
  • BlackRock said it will pause all PAC donations, and will meanwhile "conduct a thorough review of the events and evaluate how we will focus our political activity going forward," according to a company memo obtained by Axios.
  • Airbnb said its PAC will withhold donations to lawmakers "who voted against the certification of the presidential election results.”

Go deeper

Off the Rails

Episode 8: The siege

Photo illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios. Photos: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Beginning on election night 2020 and continuing through his final days in office, Donald Trump unraveled and dragged America with him, to the point that his followers sacked the U.S. Capitol with two weeks left in his term. Axios takes you inside the collapse of a president with a special series.

Episode 8: The siege. An inside account of the deadly insurrection at the Capitol on Jan. 6 that ultimately failed to block the certification of the Electoral College. And, finally, Trump's concession.

On Jan. 6, White House deputy national security adviser Matt Pottinger entered the West Wing in the mid-afternoon, shortly after his colleagues' phones had lit up with an emergency curfew alert from D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser.

Updated 6 hours ago - World

Mexican President López Obrador tests positive for coronavirus

Mexico's President Andrés Manuel López Obrador during a press conference at National Palace in Mexico City, Mexico, on Wednesday. Photo: Ismael Rosas/Eyepix Group/Barcroft Media via Getty Images

Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador announced Sunday evening that he's tested positive for COVID-19.

Driving the news: López Obrador tweeted that he has mild symptoms and is receiving medical treatment. "As always, I am optimistic," he added. "We will all move forward."

6 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Sarah Huckabee Sanders to run for governor of Arkansas

Sarah Huckabee Sanders at FOX News' studios in New York City in 2019. Photo: Steven Ferdman/Getty Images

Former White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders will announce Monday that she's running for governor of Arkansas.

The big picture: Sanders was touted as a contender after it was announced she was leaving the Trump administration in June 2019. Then-President Trump tweeted he hoped she would run for governor, adding "she would be fantastic." Sanders is "seen as leader in the polls" in the Republican state, notes the Washington Post's Josh Dawsey, who first reported the news.

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