Photo: Andrew Chin/Getty Images

Clothing brand Brooks Brothers on Wednesday filed for bankruptcy, per Marketwatch, becoming the latest retail giant to topple amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Why it matters, via Axios' Dan Primack: Brooks Brothers is the poster child for the retail apocalypse. Legacy retail brands were already struggling before the pandemic, facing the death of brick-and-mortar stores as shopping shifts online. The company, which has relatively little debt and no private equity owners, still generated around 80% of its sales in physical stores that have been mostly shuttered for months — as demand for business attire has cratered with consumers working from home.

Go deeper

Auto sales may have turned a corner

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

U.S. auto sales have bounced back in recent months despite the coronavirus pandemic, with some brands even seeing their sales increase over 2019's numbers at this point in the year.

Why it matters: Cars and trucks were seen as one of the sectors that would be hardest hit as Americans were called to stay home from work and entertainment destinations were shuttered.

How small businesses got stiffed by the coronavirus pandemic

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

The story of American businesses in the coronavirus pandemic is a tale of two markets — one made up of tech firms and online retailers as winners awash in capital, and another of brick-and-mortar mom-and-pop shops that is collapsing.

Why it matters: The coronavirus pandemic has created an environment where losing industries like traditional retail and hospitality as well as a sizable portion of firms owned by women, immigrants and people of color are wiped out and may be gone for good.

Apple's antitrust fight turns Epic

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Millions of angry gamers may soon join the chorus of voices calling for an antitrust crackdown on Apple, as the iPhone giant faces a new lawsuit and PR blitz from Epic Games, maker of mega-hit Fortnite.

Why it matters: Apple is one of several Big Tech firms accused of violating the spirit, if not the letter, of antitrust law. A high-profile lawsuit could become a roadmap for either building a case against tech titans under existing antitrust laws or writing new ones better suited to the digital economy.