Sep 4, 2019

Victim in Brock Turner sexual assault case comes forward

Photo: Courtesy of 60 Minutes

Chanel Miller, known until now as Emily Doe, is set to release a book titled "Know My Name" this month detailing her experience as the victim of sexual assault by Stanford University swimmer Brock Turner in 2016, per the New York Times.

Background: Miller was intoxicated and unconscious when Turner sexually assaulted her after a fraternity party at Stanford. Turner was found guilty on 3 counts of felony sexual assault and was eligible for up to 14 years in prison, but received a sentence of 6 months and only served 3. Judge Aaron Persky, who has since been recalled by California voters, argued "a prison sentence would have a severe impact" on the 20-year-old Turner.

  • Although Miller's case happened prior to the rise of #MeToo, it sparked a national dialogue about consent and male privilege. Miller's victim impact statement was widely shared, and it detailed the scarring effects that sexual misconduct can have long after the event.
  • Then Gov. Jerry Brown (D-Calif.) signed a bill in response to the case implementing mandatory minimums for sexual assault.

What to watch: The book is set to be released Sept. 24 by Viking. Miller also did her first on-camera interview with 60 minutes, which is set to premiere on Sept. 22.

Go deeper: Global #MeToo movement has resulted in 6 convictions, 6 charges

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Without evidence, Stephen Miller claims whistleblower is a "deep-state operative"

White House senior adviser Stephen Miller claimed on "Fox News Sunday" that the whistleblower who filed a complaint about President Trump's interactions with Ukraine is a "deep state operative" who does not deserve to be honored for forwarding a "partisan hit job."

Go deeperArrowSep 29, 2019

Big Tech's moral compass remains glitchy

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

More than 2 years after Susan Fowler's account of sexual harassment at Uber kicked off a wave of reckoning inside tech companies, the industry is still more reactive than forward-looking in handling the ethical issues raised by sexual misconduct.

Why it matters: By waiting for media exposure before taking principled action against sexual harassment and related misdeeds, some tech leaders are still sending a message of "get away with it as long as you can" rather than "do what's right."

Go deeperArrowSep 9, 2019

Patriots release Antonio Brown amid misconduct accusations

Photo: John Tlumacki/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

The New England Patriots released wide receiver Antonio Brown on Friday, according to a team news release, after a second woman came forward with reports of sexual misconduct.

What they're saying: Per a statement, a Patriots spokesperson said it was time to "move in a different direction," given the NFL's investigation into allegations against the player, who has been mired in controversy since his departure from the Oakland Raiders earlier this month.

Go deeperArrowSep 20, 2019