FEMA administrator Brock Long. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

FEMA administrator Brock Long announced Wednesday that he is resigning from his post. Peter Gaynor will serve as acting administrator.

The big picture: Long had been criticized and investigated by the Department of Homeland Security's inspector general for allegedly misusing government vehicles to travel to his home in North Carolina. Though he led FEMA through a record series of natural disasters, per Bloomberg, he and the Trump administration came under significant scrutiny for their response to the devastation caused by Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico.

Statement from Long:

“It has been a great honor to serve our country as FEMA Administrator for the past two years. During my tenure, the Agency worked more than 220 declared disasters. President Trump, Vice President Pence and Secretary Nielsen have been extremely supportive of me, the FEMA workforce and our mission. The President and his entire Administration provided unprecedented support to the Agency as we led the nation through the historic 2017 hurricane and wildfire season. With this Administration’s leadership, we also improved and transformed the field of emergency management through the enactment of our Agency’s Strategic Plan and partnership with Congress on the passage of the Disaster Recovery Reform Act (DRRA).
“While this has been the opportunity of the lifetime, it is time for me to go home to my family – my beautiful wife and two incredible boys. As a career emergency management professional, I could not be prouder to have worked alongside the devoted, hardworking men and women of FEMA for the past two years. Upon my departure, Mr. Peter Gaynor, will serve as Acting FEMA Administrator. I leave knowing the Agency is in good hands.”

Go deeper: All the high-profile Trump administration departures

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