The Lyric Theatre where "Harry Potter and the Cursed Child" resides has remained dark since Broadway closed its doors in March. Photo: Ira L. Black/Corbis via Getty Images

Broadway's 41 theaters will remain closed through Jan. 3, 2021, as the industry tries to hammer out its next steps amid the coronavirus pandemic, trade group the Broadway League announced Monday.

Why it matters, per Axios' Sara Fischer: It's the biggest economic crisis to hit Broadway in decades. Even during past recessions, Broadway has rallied. But with theaters physically shut, the theater community must rally around digital alternatives to survive.

  • Broadway's success is determined by attendance, an economic model that makes social distancing impractical for profitability. The League said it's working with unions on the next steps to ensure the safety of everyone.
  • The Tony Awards was also postponed this year and Disney shuttered "Frozen" on Broadway in May.

The big picture: With the closure of theaters, Broadway is doing more than ever to convert its songs and shows for digital audiences. The biggest litmus test for whether Broadway will be able to successfully capture the attention of audiences online will be when Disney debuts "Hamilton" on Disney+ July 3.

What they're saying:

  • "The Broadway experience can be deeply personal but it is also, crucially, communal. The alchemy of 1000 strangers bonding into a single audience fueling each performer on stage and behind the scenes will be possible again when Broadway theatres can safely host full houses," chair of the Broadway League, Thomas Schumacher, said in a statement.

Of note: Those who have purchased Broadway tickets up to Jan. 3, 2021, qualify for a refund or exchange. Buyers should receive an email by July 13 from "their point of purchase" regarding the exchange process.

Go deeper

MLB postpones Cardinals-Pirates series over coronavirus outbreak

Paul Goldschmidt #46 of the St. Louis Cardinals hits a single against the Pittsburgh Pirates seventh inning at Busch Stadium on July 25 in St Louis, Missouri. Photo: Dilip Vishwanat/Getty Images

Major League Baseball announced in a statement Sunday that it has postponed the St. Louis Cardinals' three-game series against the Pittsburgh Pirates, set to start Monday, because of a coronavirus outbreak.

Why it matters: St. Louis has had 13 games in a row postponed after seven players and six staff members tested positive for COVID-19 last week. The MLB announced Friday another Cardinals staff member and two more players tested positive for the virus. The MLB said "in light of the most recent positive test results," the league and the Cardinals "believe it is prudent to conduct additional testing while players and staff are quarantined before the team returns to play."

Go deeper: How baseball's coronavirus reckoning affects everything

Aug 10, 2020 - Health

New York reports new low positive coronavirus test rate

People physically distancing at tables in New York City's Times Square in June. Photo: Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) announced Sunday 515 people, or 0.78% of those tested, returned a positive reading for COVID-19 the previous day.

Why it matters: It's the lowest single-day positive rate since the start of the pandemic. It's another sign that the state that was once a global coronavirus epicenter is curbing the spread of the virus. "Our daily numbers remain low and steady, despite increasing infection rates across the country, and even in our region," Cuomo said in a statement. "But we must not become complacent: Everyone should continue to wear their masks and socially distance."

Aug 9, 2020 - Health

Ohio governor urges Americans not to lose faith in testing after false positive

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine (R) said on CNN's "State of the Union" Sunday that Americans shouldn't think testing for the coronavirus is "not reliable or doesn't work," after he received a false positive result from an antigen test last week.

Why it matters: DeWine is one of six governors who have agreed to pool their resources, along with the Rockefeller Foundation, in order to acquire 3 million antigen tests amid severe delays and the lack of a national testing strategy.