Photos: Michael Reynolds-Pool, Saul Loeb-Pool/Getty Images

Ford and Kavanaugh both fought back tears as they told the committee about the toll the past few weeks have taken on their families. The similarities ended there.

Why it matters: It was a scene students will study long after we are gone. A cool, credible Christine Blasey Ford methodically outlined how the Republican nominee to the Supreme Court allegedly sought to rape her in high school. An angry and tearful Brett Kavanaugh accused the Democrats of a devious plot to destroy his life, his family, his nomination.

The scene: Ford was quiet, and sometimes hard to hear inside the committee room. She told the committee she wished she could “be more helpful,” that she had never wanted to enter the political fray, but that she could never forget certain details of her alleged assault.

  • Kavanaugh strode across the committee room not just to deny those accusations, but to tear into Senate Democrats. He accused them of “laying in wait” to destroy him and making a “national disgrace” of the Supreme Court confirmation process.
  • Emotions ran high all day. The entire hearing room sat rapt as Ford tearfully recounted the episode she says occurred at a high-school party in 1982, and in stunned silence as Kavanaugh excoriated Democrats and broke down over his daughter saying a bedtime prayer for Ford.

A tale of two quotes:

  • Kavanaugh to Senate Democrats: “My family and my name have been totally and permanently destroyed... This confirmation process has become a national disgrace … you have replaced advice and consent with search and destroy.”
  • Ford describing what she remembers from the alleged attack: "Indelible, in the hippocampus is the laughter. The uproarious laughter between the two [Kavanaugh and Judge] ... and they're having fun at my expense."

What's next: The Senate Judiciary, which Republicans control with 11 male members, is scheduled to vote tomorrow. It then goes to the full Senate.

The big question: Do senators believe Ford, or Kavanaugh? And if they believe Ford, should that disqualify Kavanaugh?

Republicans we're watching:

  • Ben Sasse (on Judiciary)
  • Jeff Flake (on Judiciary)
  • Shelley Moore Capito
  • Lisa Murkowski
  • Susan Collins

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The pandemic is getting worse again

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Data: The COVID Tracking Project, state health departments; Note: Due to a database error, Missouri had a 3 day gap in reporting from Oct. 11-13; Map: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

Every available piece of data proves it: The coronavirus pandemic is getting worse again, all across America.

The big picture: As the death toll ticks past 212,000, at a moment when containing the virus ought to be easier and more urgent than ever, we are instead giving it a bigger foothold to grow from.

SurveyMonkey poll: Young voters' red-state blue wall

Data: SurveyMonkey; Chart: Danielle Alberti/Axios

There are only five states in the U.S. where voters younger than 35 embrace President Trump over Joe Biden, and none are swing states, according to new 50-state SurveyMonkey-Tableau data for Axios.

Why it matters: These scattered red spots in a sea of blue vividly illustrate Trump's peril if young people were to actually turn out this year. Put another way, Trump's path to re-election depends heavily on younger adults staying home.

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Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

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