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Rep. Ayanna Pressley (D-Mass.) is set to introduce legislation Tuesday demanding impeachment proceedings against Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh after a weekend report expanded allegations of sexual misconduct against him, The Hill reports.

  • "Sexual predators do not deserve a seat on the nation’s highest court and Brett Kavanaugh’s confirmation process set a dangerous precedent," Pressley said in a statement. "We must demand justice for survivors and hold Kavanaugh accountable for his actions."

Driving the news: A number of presidential candidates and lawmakers over the weekend began calling for Kavanaugh's impeachment. A New York Times report Saturday unveiled that a Yale classmate of Kavanaugh's, Max Stier, told the FBI and Senators that he'd once seen Kavanaugh take his pants down at a party and that his friends thrusted his penis into a woman's hand.

  • The FBI did not investigate the event.
  • The Times ultimately corrected its story to note that "the book reports that the female student declined to be interviewed and that friends say she does not recall the incident."
  • The NYT also outlined details of an incident against Deborah Ramirez, who alleges Kavanaugh once swung his exposed penis at her, causing her hand to touch it as she attempted to ward him off. Ramirez had publicly accused Kavanaugh of misconduct during his confirmation process.

Reality check: Some senior Democrats have deemed the idea as unrealistic, Politico notes.

  • “We’ve got to get beyond this ‘impeachment is the answer to every problem.’ It’s not realistic,” Senate Minority Whip Dick Durbin said Monday. “If that’s how we are identified in Congress, as the impeachment Congress, we run the risk that people will feel we’re ignoring the issues that mean a lot to them as families.”

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U.S. policy shift will allow taxpayer funding for projects in West Bank settlements

Friedman (L) with Netanyahu. Photo: Menahem Kahana/AFP via Getty Images

The U.S. and Israel will announce tomorrow that they are expanding three agreements on scientific cooperation to include Israeli settlements in the West Bank, Israeli and U.S. officials tell me.

Why it matters: This is a substantial policy shift for the U.S., which did not previously allow its taxpayers' money to be spent in the Israeli settlements.

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Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

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McConnell: Confirming Amy Coney Barrett will help GOP retain Senate

Photo: Samuel Corum/Getty Images

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) expressed no regrets about Judge Amy Coney Barrett's controversial confirmation, telling Politico in an interview that he believes the decision to place her on the Supreme Court just a week before the election will help Republicans retain the Senate.

Why it matters: With a week to go until Election Day, many Republicans are concerned that President Trump's unpopularity could cost them the Senate. McConnell has long viewed the transformation of the federal judiciary through the confirmation of young conservative judges as his defining legacy.