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Boris Johnson meets with Mike Pompeo in Washington. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Awaiting the White House Middle East peace plan, the U.K is organizing a meeting of Foreign Ministers from the main European powers and leading Arab states with President Trump's peace team, Jared Kushner and Jason Greenblatt.

Between the lines: Western diplomats briefed on the British move told me the aim of the meeting will be to present parameters the European and Arab countries expect to see in the Trump administration peace plan in order for them to support it. The main concern in European capitals is that the peace plan will be biased in favor of Israel.

Western diplomats and Israeli officials tell me that a few weeks ago, British foreign secretary Boris Johnson met Jared Kushner in Washington and pitched him the idea for the meeting.

  • Johnson told Kushner he wants the U.S. peace plan to succeed and therefore it is important it include input from the European powers ,who have been invested in the peace process for three decades.
  • Kushner's response was positive. He told Johnson he wants to get input and recommendations from the Europeans. According to a source briefed on the meeting, Kushner stressed to Johnson that at the end of the day it will be a U.S. peace plan and its final parameters will be determined by Trump.
  • In the last few weeks, Johnson spoke about his initiative with the foreign ministers of France, Germany, Egypt, Jordan and Saudi Arabia. A western diplomat briefed on those conversations said Johnson wants to draft a set of principles the Europeans will present to the White House, including "red lines" on which their support depends.

Western diplomats said the meeting is expected to take place in early July but it is still unclear whether it will be in Washington or Europe. It is also unclear whether the Arab foreign ministers will join the meeting.

  • Kushner and Greenblatt are going to travel next week to the region for talks in Jerusalem, Cairo, Riyadh, Doha and Amman about the U.S. peace plan and about the crisis in Gaza.
  • A main part of their talks in Arab capitals will focus on trying to encourage Arab leaders to support the plan. King Abdullah of Jordan is expected to arrive soon to Washington and he will meet President Trump to discuss, among other issues, the administration's peace plan.

Go deeper

Japan to release Fukushima water into sea

People near storage tanks for radioactive water at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Okuma, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan, in 2020. Photo: Tomohiro Ohsumi/Getty Images

Japan's government on Tuesday announced plans to release more than 1 million metric tons of contaminated water from the destroyed Fukushima nuclear plant into the Pacific Ocean following a treatment process.

Why it matters: While the Biden administration has said Japan appears to have met globally accepted nuclear safety standards, officials in South Korea, China and Taiwan, local residents, those in the fishing industry and green groups oppose the plans, due to begin in about two years, per the Guardian.

In photos: Twin Cities on edge after Daunte Wright shooting

Demonstrators shout "Don't shoot" at the police after curfew on April 12 as they protest the death of Daunte Wright, who was shot and killed by a police officer in Brooklyn Center, Minnesota, a day earlier. Photo: Kerem Yucel/AFP via Getty Images

There were tense scenes in the Twin Cities suburb of Brooklyn Center Monday night, after demonstrators defied a 7 p.m. curfew to protest for a second night the fatal police shooting of Daunte Wright.

The big picture: The curfew was announced following a night of protests and unrest over the killing of Wright, 20, during a traffic stop Sunday. Following peaceful protests and a daytime vigil, police again deployed tear gas during clashes with protesters Monday night, according to reporters on the scene.

In photos: Life along the U.S.-Mexico border

Children at the border of the Puerto de Anapra colonia of Ciudad Juárez, Mexico, hang on a border fence and look to Sunland Park, N.M. Photo: Russell Contreras/Axios

Axios traveled to McAllen and El Paso, Texas, and Ciudad Juárez, Mexico, to see how the communities are responding to an increase of migrants from Central America.

Of note: The region in South and West Texas are among the poorest in the nation and rarely are the regions covered in depth beyond the soundbites and press conference. Axios reporters Stef Kight and Russell Contreras walked the streets of McAllen, El Paso, Texas, and Ciudad Juárez to record images that struck them.