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Johnson during a moment of silence to honor the U.K.'s essential workers. Photo: Stefan Rousseau/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson said in an interview with The Sun on Sunday that the rapid deterioration of his condition while suffering from the coronavirus had doctors preparing how to announce his death.

What he's saying: “It was a tough old moment, I won’t deny it. They had a strategy to deal with a ‘death of Stalin’-type scenario. I was not in particularly brilliant shape and I was aware there were contingency plans in place. The doctors had all sorts of arrangements for what to do if things went badly wrong."

  • “It was hard to believe that in just a few days my health had deteriorated to this extent. I remember feeling frustrated. I couldn’t understand why I wasn’t getting better."
  • "But the bad moment came when it was 50-50 whether they were going to have to put a tube down my windpipe. That was when it got a bit ... they were starting to think about how to handle it presentationally."

The big picture: Johnson, the first major world leader to be diagnosed with the coronavirus, spent three days in the intensive care unit of London's St. Thomas’ Hospital last month. He only recently returned to work after recovering from his illness and after the birth of his son, whom he named after the health care workers who saved his life.

  • Johnson has celebrated the "success" of the U.K. in fighting the virus, but the reality is that the country has the third-worst death toll in the world and is on track to be the worst-hit in Europe.
  • The U.K. has reported 183,500 confirmed cases and 28,205 deaths from the coronavirus as of Sunday, according to Johns Hopkins data.

Go deeper: Boris Johnson skipped five virus briefings in early days of pandemic

Go deeper

Updated Oct 16, 2020 - Health

U.S. coronavirus updates

Expand chart
Data: The COVID Tracking Project; Note: Does not include probable deaths from New York City; Map: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

The U.S. surpassed 8 million coronavirus cases on Friday, per Johns Hopkins data.

The big picture: Coronavirus infections jumped by almost 17% over the past week as the number of new cases across the country increased in 38 states and Washington, D.C., according to a seven-day average tracked by Axios.

Aug 9, 2020 - Health

Ex-FDA head: U.S. will "definitely" see 200,000 to 300,000 virus deaths in 2020

Former FDA commissioner Scott Gottlieb said on CBS News' "Face the Nation" that the coronavirus death toll in the U.S. will be "definitely" somewhere between 200,000 and 300,000 by the end of 2020.

Why it matters: "Whether we're closer to 200,000 or closer to 300,000 depends on what we do now and how it evolves," Gottlieb warned on Sunday as the U.S. surpassed five million confirmed coronavirus cases.

32 mins ago - World

U.K. prosecutors charge third person in poisoning of former Russian spy

Emergency services members in biohazard encapsulated suits encasing the poisoning scene in a tent in Salisbury, England, in March 2018. Ben Stansall/AFP via Getty Images

U.K. prosecutors said they had enough evidence to charge Denis Sergeev, a member of the Russian military intelligence service, in the 2018 Salisbury nerve agent attack against a former Russian spy, according to AP.

Why it matters: Sergeev is the third person to face charges for the nerve agent attack against Sergei Skripal and his daughter, Yulia, both of whom survived.