Sign up for our daily briefing

Make your busy days simpler with Axios AM/PM. Catch up on what's new and why it matters in just 5 minutes.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Twin Cities

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa Bay news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa Bay

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Charlotte news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Charlotte

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Bolton at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina on February 17. Photo: Logan Cyrus/AFP via Getty Images

The Justice Department applied for an emergency temporary restraining order against former national security adviser John Bolton on Wednesday, in an attempt to block the publication of his tell-all book and what the agency identifies as classified information.

Driving the news: Significant excerpts from Bolton's book were published by the New York Times, the Washington Post and the Wall Street Journal on Wednesday.

What's new: Bolton alleges that President Trump asked Chinese President Xi Jinping to increase agricultural purchases from the U.S. to improve his electoral prospects in farming states, according to advanced copies of the book published Wednesday.

What they're saying: "The majority of this motion is largely irrelevant, as Bolton himself can be enjoined by DOJ until they're blue in the face and it won't matter one bit," national security lawyer Bradley Moss tweeted on Wednesday. "Bolton no longer has control or authority over the book: his publisher does."

  • The White House referred Axios to a comment from press secretary Kayleigh McEnany at a Wednesday briefing when asked about details that emerged in Bolton's allegations. McEnany said Wednesday that the book is "full of classified information."
  • "Tonight’s filing by the government is a frivolous, politically motivated exercise in futility. Hundreds of thousands of copies of John Bolton’s THE ROOM WHERE IT HAPPENED have already been distributed around the country and the world. The injunction as requested by the government would accomplish nothing," Simon & Schuster's senior vice president for corporate communications said in a statement on Wednesday.
  • The DOJ filed a lawsuit in federal court on Tuesday to block Bolton from publishing the book. Bolton's lawyer Charles Cooper said in a statement in response to the lawsuit, "We are reviewing the Government’s complaint, and will respond in due course."

What's next: Prosecutors are requesting the U.S. District Court schedule a hearing on the requested restraining order by Friday, since Bolton's book is scheduled to be released next Tuesday.

Read the emergency restraining order application:

Go deeper: Highlights from the excerpts of John Bolton's book

Go deeper

Mike Allen, author of AM
Sep 24, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Woodward book sells 600,000 copies in Week 1

Screenshot via CNN

Simon & Schuster announced that Bob Woodward’s "Rage" sold 600,000 copies in the U.S. in Week 1, including pre-orders, sales of print books, ebooks, audiobooks and e-audiobooks.

The big picture: Woodward's book dropped a series of scathing reports on President Trump, including that he purposefully played down the seriousness of the coronavirus pandemic.

The rebellion against Silicon Valley (the place)

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Smith Collection/Gado via Getty Images

Silicon Valley may be a "state of mind," but it's also very much a real enclave in Northern California. Now, a growing faction of the tech industry is boycotting it.

Why it matters: The Bay Area is facing for the first time the prospect of losing its crown as the top destination for tech workers and startups — which could have an economic impact on the region and force it to reckon with its local issues.

Erica Pandey, author of @Work
1 hour ago - Economy & Business

Telework's tax mess

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

As teleworkers flit from city to city, they're creating a huge tax mess.

Why it matters: Our tax laws aren't built for telecommuting, and this new way of working could have dire implications for city and state budgets.

You’ve caught up. Now what?

Sign up for Mike Allen’s daily Axios AM and PM newsletters to get smarter, faster on the news that matters.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!