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Woodward with Robert Costa. Photo via YouTube.

When Bob Woodward called President Trump to warn him that "Rage" would be "a tough book," Trump replied, as Woodward recounted on "60 Minutes": "Well, I didn’t get you on this book. Maybe I’ll get you on the next one." He'll get a chance sooner than he thought.

Driving the news: Bob Woodward and Robert Costa, both of The Washington Post, are teaming up to write a book on the final days of the Trump presidency and the first phase of the Biden presidency.

  • It'll be Woodward's 21st book, all published by Simon & Schuster, and Costa’s first.
  • "We're two pure reporters — what happened and why — and this is a perfect landscape for that kind of work," Woodward told me.

No title or publication date are being given, but I'm told this'll be done on a compressed timeline.

  • Robert Barnett represented both. Jonathan Karp, CEO of Simon & Schuster, will edit the book. 

Woodward will remain an associate editor of The Post, and Costa will remain a national political reporter, on leave. 

  • Costa is also moderator and managing editor of "Washington Week" on PBS, a job he's held since 2017. And he has been a political analyst for MSNBC and NBC News since 2015. Costa is expected to focus entirely on the book in the coming year, according to a person familiar with the project.

⚡ Also in Woodwardland ... After working feet away from Bob in his Georgetown home office for six books and 13 years, editor and researcher Evelyn M. Duffy is going full-time with her book-doctor practice, Open Boat Editing.

  • "While working in-house with Woodward, Duffy spent nights and weekends building her company, ... editing book proposals and manuscripts for journalists and other nonfiction writers." Follow her: @_EvelynMDuffy.
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Go deeper

26 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Biden's latest executive order: Buy American

President Joe R. Biden speaks about the economy before signing executive orders in the State Dining Room at the White House on Friday, Jan 22, 2021 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)

President Joe Biden will continue his flurry of executive orders on Monday, signing a new directive to require the federal government to “buy American” for products and services.

Why it matters: The executive action is yet another attempt by Biden to accomplish goals administratively without waiting for the backing of Congress. The new order echoes Biden's $400 billion campaign pledge to increase government purchases of American goods.

Tech digs in for long domestic terror fight

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

With domestic extremist networks scrambling to regroup online, experts fear the next attack could come from a radicalized individual — much harder than coordinated mass events for law enforcement and platforms to detect or deter.

The big picture: Companies like Facebook and Twitter stepped up enforcement and their conversations with law enforcement ahead of Inauguration Day. But they'll be tested as the threat rises that impatient lone-wolf attackers will lash out.