Michael Bloomberg. Photo: Michael Ciaglo/Getty Images

Former Mayor Michael Bloomberg (D-N.Y.) released a gun safety plan as part of his 2020 platform on Thursday.

The big picture: Gun control has been a key issue for Democrats in the crowded presidential primary field. The party largely advocates for common sense reforms to address background checks, loopholes and assault weapons.

Details... Bloomberg seeks to:

  • Boost background checks by closing the private sale loophole, requiring all gun owners to obtain a permit, using sale records in criminal investigations, allowing for extreme risk screenings and regulating the 3-D printing of guns.
  • Keep guns out of unsafe hands by closing loopholes that allow domestic abusers to own firearms, passing federal red flag laws, raising the minimum age to own a gun to 21, subjecting all gun purchases to a 48-hour waiting period and temporarily prohibiting gun ownership for those convicted of assault or violent misdemeanors.
  • Banning assault weapons and high-capacity magazines, requiring secure storage of firearms and prohibiting guns in K-12 schools and colleges with the exception of law enforcement.
  • Address local gun violence by investing "at least" $100 million annually in local intervention programs, increasing ATF funding by $100 million annually and giving $100 million annually to public health research about gun violence.
  • Holding the the gun industry accountable through legislation and appointing a "White House gun coordinator to mobilize the public to fight gun violence."

Go deeper: Michael Bloomberg on the issues, in under 500 words

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Scoop: How the White House is trying to trap leakers

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

President Trump's chief of staff, Mark Meadows, has told several White House staffers he's fed specific nuggets of information to suspected leakers to see if they pass them on to reporters — a trap that would confirm his suspicions. "Meadows told me he was doing that," said one former White House official. "I don't know if it ever worked."

Why it matters: This hunt for leakers has put some White House staffers on edge, with multiple officials telling Axios that Meadows has been unusually vocal about his tactics. So far, he's caught only one person, for a minor leak.

Updated 3 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 4 p.m. ET: 12,813,864 — Total deaths: 566,790 — Total recoveries — 7,046,535Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 4 p.m. ET: 3,286,025 — Total deaths: 135,089 — Total recoveries: 995,576 — Total tested: 39,553,395Map.
  3. States: Florida smashes single-day record for new coronavirus cases with over 15,000 — Miami-Dade mayor says "it won't be long" until county's hospitals reach capacity.
  4. Public health: Ex-FDA chief projects "apex" of South's coronavirus curve in 2-3 weeks — Coronavirus testing czar: Lockdowns in hotspots "should be on the table"
  5. Education: Betsy DeVos says schools that don't reopen shouldn't get federal funds — Pelosi accuses Trump of "messing with the health of our children."

11 GOP congressional nominees support QAnon conspiracy

Lauren Boebert posing in her restaurant in Rifle, Colorado, on April 24. Photo: Emily Kask/AFP

At least 11 Republican congressional nominees have publicly supported or defended the QAnon conspiracy theory movement or some of its tenets — and more aligned with the movement may still find a way onto ballots this year.

Why it matters: Their progress shows how a fringe online forum built on unsubstantiated claims and flagged as a threat by the FBI is seeking a foothold in the U.S. political mainstream.