Jan 22, 2020

Bloomberg targets Trump for his "empty promises" on infrastructure

Photo: Ray Chavez/Bay Area News Group

Michael Bloomberg's 2020 campaign is releasing a digital ad on Wednesday that goes after President Trump for his "empty promises" on infrastructure.

Why it matters: Bloomberg is continuing to spend his unlimited funds on ads that question Trump's governing abilities, which have prompted Trump to tweet negatively about his billionaire rival on several occasions. The ads highlight an issue on many voters' minds while impeachment is consuming Washington.

What they're saying:

"As a candidate, Donald Trump promised to deliver an infrastructure bill in his first 100 days in office. Three years later, he has delivered nothing. Candidate Trump complained that politicians 'only know how to talk' about infrastructure but no politician has talked more about infrastructure, with less results to show for it, than President Trump. Instead of working to forge consensus and deliver the funding we need, President Trump has done what he always does: blame other people for his own failures. We can't afford four more years of empty promises and finger-pointing."
— Bloomberg said in a statement

Go deeper: Bloomberg says he's spending all of his money to defeat Trump

Go deeper

Mike Bloomberg copies Trump to beat Trump

Photo: Timothy A. Clary/AFP via Getty Images

To beat President Trump, Mike Bloomberg wants to be candidate Trump.

The state of play: Axios visited Bloomberg's new campaign HQ in Times Square yesterday, and we were struck by how much his 1,000+-person team is learning from — while trying to surpass — the Trump campaigns of 2016 and 2020.

Go deeperArrowUpdated Jan 23, 2020

Bloomberg's big bet on the power of money

Data: Advertising Analytics, FEC; Chart: Danielle Alberti/Axios

Michael Bloomberg’s prolific spending aims to make him as legitimate and familiar as his rivals. It also confronts two realities: President Trump is out-raising all the other Democrats with ease, and the Democratic National Committee is anemic.

Why it matters: Bloomberg is betting that enough exposure — through a $300m+ ad campaign and a non-traditional run that looks past the early four states — will make him competitive in Super Tuesday, and make all Democrats stronger in the general election.

Trump-Bloomberg feuding reaches new levels

Mike Bloomberg addresses local leaders in Oakland, California, as part of his focus on states with large numbers of delegates, Jan. 17. Photo: Ray Chavez/Bay Area News Group.

Maybe it was the eye-popping FEC data about Mike Bloomberg's Q4 spending. Or a rivalry over their Super Bowl ads. Or a change to Democrats' rules that may soon allow Bloomberg to participate in the primary debates.

In any case, President Trump raged overnight on Twitter, primarily going after the height of the 5-foot-8 billionaire who's running as a Democrat. And Bloomberg's campaign shot back, hitting Trump for his weight and hue.