CNN's Anderson Cooper questions Joe Biden last night at a drive-in town hall in Moosic, Pa., outside Scranton. Photo: CNN

Mike Bloomberg's $100 million Florida blitz begins today and will continue "wall to wall" in all 10 TV markets through Election Day, advisers tell me.

Why it matters: Bloomberg thinks that Joe Biden putting away Florida is the most feasible way to head off the national chaos we could have if the outcome of Trump v. Biden remained uncertain long after Election Day.

  • "If Biden wins Florida, it's much harder for Trump to falsely claim victory on election night," a Bloomberg adviser told me. "Florida is a toss-up, but winnable."

While Trump could win without what is now his home state, it'd be incredibly hard. If Biden were to pair a decisive Florida victory with a win up the coast in swing state North Carolina, we could know the new president quickly.

  • Both those states traditionally report quickly (if Florida isn't tied!), and are on Eastern time. So Biden and Bloomberg are eying them as keys to a knockout.

Bloomberg's data agency, Hawkish, revealed its "Red Mirage" scenario to "Axios on HBO" last month — the fear that with Republicans voting heavily in persona and Democrats voting heavily by mail, the map could look pretty red on election night, even if Biden is ultimately the victor.

  • Bloomberg's all-in bet on Florida is his strategy for keeping the "Red Mirage" a data model and not a reality.

Part of Bloomberg's plan is to put big money into Latino vote-by-mail mobilization ... targeted Hispanic radio, digital and get-out-the-vote efforts ... and Black and Latino groups that can help with ground game.

  • Biden's softness with Latino voters is one of the biggest alarm bells that's ringing with otherwise confident Democrats.

Below: "Responsibility," from Priorities USA Action, the ad that begins the Blooomberg blitz.

Subscribe to Axios AM/PM for a daily rundown of what's new and why it matters, directly from Mike Allen.
Please enter a valid email.
Please enter a valid email.
Server error. Please try a different email.
Subscribed! Look for Axios AM and PM in your inbox tomorrow or read the latest Axios AM now.

Go deeper

Voto Latino: Latino voters in red states are mobilizing for racial equity

Axios' Margaret Talev (left) and María Teresa Kumar, CEO and president of Voto Latino. Photo: Axios

María Teresa Kumar, CEO and president of Voto Latino, said Friday that Black and Latino voters for the first time see racial justice as a top issue, not just at the national level but in their state and local governments.

By the numbers: Fifteen million Latinos are eligible to vote in this election but are not registered. Four million Latino Americans have become eligible to vote since 2016, and every 30 seconds a Latino becomes of age to vote.

Updated Oct 20, 2020 - Axios Events

Watch: A conversation on America's voting barriers

On Tuesday, October 23, Axios' Sara Kehaulani Goo, Margaret Talev, and Alexi McCammond hosted a virtual event on barriers to voting access across the country, featuring Southwest Voter Registration Education Project President Lydia Camarillo, U.S. Election Assistance Commission Chairman Benjamin Hovland, Florida Rights Restoration Coalition President Desmond Meade and "The West Wing" actors Janel Moloney and Richard Schiff.

Benjamin Hovland unpacked how to vote safely during this unprecedented year and highlighted the uptick in mail-in ballots and early voting.

  • On a notable increase in early ballots being cast: "We're seeing a surge in early in-person voting...We're already at around 30 million Americans that have already voted in the 2020 election, which is pretty remarkable."
  • On the impact of the pandemic on mail-in ballots: "About 25% of Americans vote by mail in a normal year, or in 2016. So we're going to see an increase probably closer to half."

Lydia Camarillo discussed the importance of the Latino electorate in American elections.

  • The impact on November's election: "I think that the Latino electorate can be the deciding factor in this election — in partnership with other groups like the Black community, the Muslim community, Asian American community and progressives. They will decide the election."

Desmond Meade, who helped lead the 2018 fight for Amendment 4 in Florida, unpacked the expansion of voting rights and Florida's impact on similar state-level policy changes across the country.

  • On restoring felon rights: "This thing has caught on like a wildfire. All across this country, people are really standing up. Because America is a nation of second chances. And it's showing up right now in a major way."

Janel Moloney and Richard Schiff discussed the recent "The West Wing" episode on HBO Max and the experience of reuniting as an ensemble cast.

  • Richard Schiff on the meaning of the episode: "It's a rare thing in this day and age around the world to have the privilege to vote and the right to vote. And we should be very careful to not let it be extinguished and that this episode addresses that."

Axios Vice President of Event Kristin Burkhalter hosted a View from the Top segment with Lyft Head of Policy Engagement and Strategic Partnerships Heather Foster who discussed how transportation plays a critical role in voting access.

  • "We took a look at the statistics that came out of 2016, and it was estimated at the time that more than 15 million eligible voters did not go to the polls because they lacked a way to get there."

This event was the first in a yearlong series called Hard Truths, where we'll be discussing the wide ranging impact of systemic racism in America. Read our deep dive on race and voting here.

Thank you Lyft for sponsoring this event.

Ben Geman, author of Generate
Oct 23, 2020 - Energy & Environment

Biden looks to stem oil "transition" furor amid GOP attacks

Former Vice President Joe Biden. ANGELA WEISS / Getty Images

Joe Biden's campaign is looking to blunt attacks in response to his comments in Thursday night's debate about a "transition from the oil industry," as Republicans look to make the remarks a liability in the closing days of the race.

Driving the news: Biden campaign spokesperson Bill Russo, in comments circulated to reporters Friday afternoon, said the former VP "would not get rid of fossil fuels," but wants to end subsidies.