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Photo: Fabrice Coffrini/AFP via Getty Images

A new Trump administration regulation that will make it harder for some pregnant women to receive tourist visas, first reported by Axios, is now in the Federal Register and will go into effect on Friday.

Why it matters: It is one of the first efforts by the Trump administration to chip away at the ability of foreigners to take advantage of birthright citizenship.

  • The regulation officially disallows the use of visitor visas for birth tourism, although it leaves the enforcement of the change up to the discretion of a consular officer.

"The most troubling effect of this regulation is likely to be on women coming to the United States to give birth because of a medical need," wrote Migration Policy Institute's Sarah Pierce on Twitter.

  • The administration had considered a much broader regulation that would have applied to foreigners trying to come to the U.S. on temporary visas who a consular officer "reasonably expects" to give birth in the U.S, according to the final rule set to publish Friday.
  • "This rule represents the most narrowly tailored regulation to mitigate the threat," the rule reads.

The big picture: Recent attempts to crack down on birth tourism have been getting attention. Hong Kong Express Airways forced a passenger to take a pregnancy test before allowing her to fly to the U.S. commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands — a popular birth tourist destination, the Washington Post reported last week.

  • The government brought federal criminal charges against birth tourism businesses for the first time last year, CNN reported. Three people were arrested for conspiracy to commit fraud and money laundering by running a birth tourism business catering to Chinese nationals.

Go deeper: "Birth tourism" is Trump's next immigration target

Go deeper

Janet Yellen confirmed as Treasury secretary

Janet Yellen. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

The Senate voted 84-15 to confirm Janet Yellen as Treasury secretary on Monday.

Why it matters: Yellen is the first woman to serve as Treasury secretary, a Cabinet position that will be crucial in helping steer the country out of the pandemic-induced economic crisis.

Dan Primack, author of Pro Rata
3 hours ago - Economy & Business

Scoop: Red Sox strike out on deal to go public

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The parent company of the Boston Red Sox and Liverpool F.C. has ended talks to sell a minority ownership stake to RedBall Acquisition, a SPAC formed by longtime baseball executive Billy Beane and investor Gerry Cardinale, Axios has learned from multiple sources. An alternative investment, structured more like private equity, remains possible.

Why it matters: Red Sox fans won't be able to buy stock in the team any time soon.